Cover image for Women, families, and HIV/AIDS : a sociological perspective on the epidemic in America
Title:
Women, families, and HIV/AIDS : a sociological perspective on the epidemic in America
Author:
Campbell, Carole A.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xi, 257 pages ; 14 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Epidemiology, risk/transmission, and natural history of HIV disease in women and children -- Female reproductive health and sexuality -- Women at risk: drug use and prostitution -- Gender, culture, race, and class -- Men, gender roles, and sexuality -- Women, motherhood, and the family -- Women, families, and HIV/AIDS.
ISBN:
9780521562119

9780521566797
Format :
Book

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RA644.A25 C3627 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Carole Campbell examines the position of women in the AIDS epidemic (women living with HIV, and women caring for HIV-infected family members) in a sociocultural context. Campbell draws a connection among women's risk of AIDS, gender roles (particularly adolescent gender role socialization), and male sexual behavior, demonstrating that efforts to contain the spread of the disease to females must also target the male behavior that puts women at risk. This study concludes that compared with men, HIV-infected women face unequal access to care and unequal quality of care. Informed by the moving personal accounts of eleven HIV-infected men and women, this book offers a rare, broad picture of the sociocultural causes and the impact on American society of AIDS among women.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Campbell (sociology, California State Univ., Long Beach) examines the position of women in the epidemic (women living with HIV and the growing number of women who must care for HIV-infected family members) in a sociocultural context. She draws a clear connection between women's risk of contracting HIV, gender roles (particularly gender role socialization in adolescence), and the sexual behavior of men. She demonstrates that no effort to contain the spread of the disease to women can succeed without also targeting the male behavior that places women at risk. Campbell concludes that, compared with men, HIV-infected women face unequal access to care and unequal quality of care, which affects not only these women and their children but also the women who care for HIV-infected family members. She argues compellingly that social institutions such as health care and the media have created barriers for women because they fail to take account of the differences between men and women in social roles, status, and power. Informed by the personal accounts of 11 HIV-infected men and women, this book offers a broad picture of the sociocultural cause of AIDS among women and the impact of the disease on US society. Upper-division undergraduates. J. M. Howe AIDS Information Center, VA Headquarters (DC)


Table of Contents

Introduction: women at risk
1 Epidemiology, risk/transmission, and natural history of HIV disease in women and children
2 Female reproductive health and sexuality
3 Women at risk: drug use and prostitution
4 Gender, culture, race, and class
5 Men, gender roles, and sexuality
6 Women, motherhood, and the family
7 Women, men, the family, and HIV/AIDS
Appendix: method of inquiry and biographies of people living with HIV disease