Cover image for From Hiroshima to the iceman : the development and applications of accelerator mass spectrometry
Title:
From Hiroshima to the iceman : the development and applications of accelerator mass spectrometry
Author:
Gove, H. E. (Harry Edmund), 1922-
Publication Information:
Bristol, [England] ; Philadelphia : Institute of Physics, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiv, 226 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Brief biographical sketch of the author -- Historical development of accelerator mass spectrometry--1977 -- Historical development of accelerator mass spectrometry--1978-80 -- The development of tandem electrostatic accelerators -- Instrumentation for accelerator mass spectrometry -- The legacy of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki -- The initial peopling of the Americas -- The American Indians, the Vikings and Columbus -- Nuclear power, nuclear weapons and nuclear waste -- Carbon dating the Turin Shroud -- The iceman, the Dead Sea Scrools and more -- Some thoughts of future developments of AMS.
ISBN:
9780750305570

9780750305587
Format :
Book

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QC454.A25 G68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

How much difference can a new technique make to the understanding of the world? This is an account of a breakthrough in science and the insights it has brought that would not have been possible without it. Harry Gove has been involved with accelerator mass spectrometry, and here tells the story of its development and use as an ultrasensitive detection technique in many fields of science and the arts. A key advantage of the technique is that it requires only very small samples of material.


Summary

From Hiroshima to the Iceman: The Development and Applications of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry presents a fascinating account of a breakthrough in science and the insights it has brought that would not have been possible without it. Involved since its invention, Harry Gove recounts the story of the development of accelerator mass spectrometry and its use as an ultrasensitive detection technique in many fields of science and the arts. A key advantage of the technique is that it requires only very small samples of material. The book explores the areas where the technique has increased understanding and provided solutions to problems, including the clean-up and storage of nuclear waste, the effects of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, biomedical research, the settling of the Americas, and carbon dating of many precious artifacts. Objects dated include the Turin Shroud, the Iceman, the elephant bird egg, and the Dead Sea scrolls.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This rather idiosyncratic but very interesting book recounts Gove's involvement in the development and applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After a brief introduction, chapters record the early history of AMS with meticulous attention to priority of invention, and relate the development of the requisite tandem electrostatic accelerators and the associated instrumentation. Other chapters discuss specific applications of AMS to a variety of problems in which the author has been directly or indirectly involved. Many of these are archaeological, including the settlement of the Americas, the Shroud of Turin, the Iceman, and the Dead Sea scrolls. A final chapter suggests future uses of AMS. The book has a strong autobiographical flavor. The writing is sometimes slapdash and could have benefited from tighter editing. The book will appeal to a wide range of readers, including those interested in the recent history of science and in scientific contributions to archaeology. Numerous black-and-white illustrations; 16 color plates; thorough but not flawless index. General readers; undergraduates through professionals. C. W. Beck Vassar College