Cover image for The biological basis of cancer
Title:
The biological basis of cancer
Author:
McKinnell, Robert Gilmore.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xix, 378 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction : letters illustrating clinical aspects of cancer ; The pathology of cancer / G. Barry Pierce -- Metastasis / Robert G. McKinnell -- Carcinogenesis / Alan O. Perantoni -- Cancer genetics / Robert G. McKinnell -- Cancer-associated genes / Alan O. Perantoni -- Cancer in nonhuman organisms ; Epidemiology / Robert G. McKinnell -- Cancer treatment ; Biotherapy / Ralph E. Parchment -- Appendix : description of selected tumors / G. Barry Pierce.
ISBN:
9780521592987

9780521596954
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
RC261 .M436 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This textbook is designed to be used for undergraduate courses on cancer. It covers everything from the molecular to the clinical aspects of the subject, and has a lengthy bibliography designed to assist newcomers with the cancer literature. An introduction acquaints students with the biological principles of cancer and the human dimensions of the disease by considering genuine cases of cancer in fictionalized letters. Other chapters discuss cancer pathology, metastasis, carcinogenesis, genetics, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, epidemiology, and the biological basis of cancer treatment. The book includes an appendix with a description of selected cancers and also a valuable glossary of cancer-related terms. Advanced undergraduates as well as beginning graduate students will find this an essential text.


Author Notes

James Miller is the author of Brimster Tales , The Dam Builders , The Foresters , Inverness , The North Atlantic Front , Salt in the Blood , Scapa , and Swords for Hire .


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This well-organized, current, and comprehensive book on cancer is divided into several sections: pathology, metastasis, carcinogenesis, genetics, cancer in nonhuman organisms, epidemiology, treatment, and biotherapy, including drug actions. Each of the subject chapters begins with an introductory section followed by a detailed discussion that culminates with a concise summary of the chapter's findings and conclusions. Particularly interesting is the authors' novel approach, in which the introduction consists of cleverly fabricated letters from "patients" followed by author comments designed to illustrate the clinical aspects of various authentic cancer cases. The reader will appreciate the many relationships made in the appendix, which describes various selected tumors that are cross-referenced back to the letters in the introduction. Also very helpful are the numerous photomicrographs, pictures, illustrations, tables, and figures that significantly add to the understanding of the etiology, pathology, epidemiology, biology, and treatment regimens of the various cancer entities. The reader will savor both the glossary and especially the very extensive lists of alphabetically arranged reference materials, which can serve as a valuable guide for further investigation. Recommended primarily for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, as well as interested cancer professionals. H. S. Pitkow Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine


Table of Contents

G. Barry PierceG. Barry Pierce and Ivan DamjanovRobert G. McKinnellAlan O. PerantoniRobert G. McKinnellAlan O. PerantoniRobert G. McKinnellRobert G. McKinnellRobert G. McKinnellRalph E. ParchmentRalph E. ParchmentG. Barry Pierce and Ivan Damjanov
Prefacep. xv
Introduction: Letters illustrating clinical aspects of cancerp. 1
Colon cancerp. 2
Breast cancerp. 4
Acute leukemiap. 5
Lung cancerp. 6
Kidney cancerp. 7
Squamous cell cancerp. 8
Testicular cancerp. 9
Stomach cancerp. 10
Melanomap. 11
Neuroblastomap. 12
Summaryp. 13
1 The pathology of cancerp. 14
1.1 Introductionp. 14
1.2 Benign versus malignant tumorsp. 18
1.3 The diagnosis of benign and malignant tumorsp. 24
1.4 Tumor grading and stagingp. 25
1.5 Classification and nomenclaturep. 27
1.6 Metastasisp. 28
1.7 Tumor markersp. 30
1.8 How cancer killsp. 30
1.8a Organ failurep. 30
1.8b Obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, ducts, and hollow organsp. 31
1.8c Cachexia and infectionp. 33
1.9 Spontaneous regressionp. 34
1.10 Dormancyp. 35
1.11 Initiationp. 36
1.12 Latencyp. 36
1.13 Progression to the autonomous statep. 37
1.14 Selection and cellular heterogeneityp. 38
1.15 A developmental concept of cancerp. 40
1.16 Apoptosisp. 48
1.17 Summaryp. 49
2 Invasion and metastasisp. 51
2.1 Introductionp. 51
2.2 The metastatic cascadep. 54
2.2a Disruption of the basement membrane and lytic activity in the extracellular matrixp. 56
2.2b Cell detachmentp. 59
2.2c Cell migration and motilityp. 61
2.2d Invasionp. 64
2.2e Penetration of the vascular systemp. 65
2.2f Cancer cells in the circulationp. 67
2.2g Arrest of circulating cancer cells (stasis)p. 67
2.2h Extravasation, growth of metastases, and metastasis of metastasesp. 68
2.3 A multiplicity of genes are associated with metastasisp. 69
2.4 Soil and seed hypothesis of Pagetp. 70
Box: Stephen Paget: No "ploughman" was he!p. 71
2.5 Is metastasis limited to malignant cells?p. 72
2.6 How do we know a metastasis to the liver is not a primary neoplasm of the liverp. 76
2.7 Why study metastasis?p. 77
2.8 Summaryp. 78
3 Carcinogenesisp. 80
3.1 Introductionp. 80
3.2 What is a carcinogen?p. 81
3.3 Carcinogenesis as a multistage processp. 82
3.4 Chemical carcinogenesisp. 84
3.4a Organic compoundsp. 92
3.4b Inorganic compounds and asbestosp. 95
3.4c Naturally occurring chemicalsp. 98
3.5 Radiationp. 98
3.5a Ultraviolet radiationp. 98
3.5b Ionizing radiationp. 100
3.5c Endogenous ionizing radiationp. 103
3.6 Radonp. 103
3.7 Viral carcinogenesisp. 105
3.8 Endogenous carcinogenesisp. 107
3.9 Metabolism of xenobioticsp. 109
3.9a Host defensesp. 109
3.9b Inducibility of xenobiotic metabolismp. 111
3.9c Metabolic activation of chemical carcinogensp. 113
3.9d Inactivation of chemical carcinogensp. 114
3.9e Systemic distribution of chemical carcinogensp. 114
3.9f Mechanisms for carcinogen suppression/chemopreventionp. 115
Box: Elizabeth Cavert Miller with husband Jamesp. 116
3.10 Modulation of carcinogenesisp. 117
3.11 Tumor promotionp. 120
3.12 Tumor progressionp. 122
3.13 Alternative pathways for carcinogenesis?p. 123
3.14 Federal regulationsp. 123
3.15 Summaryp. 125
4 Genetics and heredityp. 126
4.1 Introductionp. 126
4.2 Chromosomes and cancerp. 127
4.2a Aneuploidyp. 127
4.2b Euploidy does not preclude genetic changep. 129
4.2c Cancers with chromosomal aberrationsp. 131
4.3 Chromosome damage, mutation, and vulnerability to cancerp. 135
4.4 Hereditary cancersp. 136
4.4a Retinoblastomap. 136
4.4b Wilms tumorp. 137
4.4c Hereditary conditions that increase cancer riskp. 138
4.5 Familial cancer syndromesp. 139
4.5a Colon cancerp. 139
4.5b Breast cancerp. 141
4.5c Prostate cancerp. 142
4.5d Microarray technology as a way of examining many genes simultaneouslyp. 143
4.6 Summaryp. 144
5 Cancer-associated genesp. 145
5.1 Introductionp. 145
5.2 What is an oncogene?p. 145
5.3 Proto-oncogenes function in signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, differentiation, or programmed cell death (apoptosis)p. 148
5.4 Genetic approaches to delineate proto-oncogene functionp. 150
5.4a DNA microarray analysis - global gene expression or genomic profilingp. 154
5.5 Classification of proto-oncogenes/ oncogenesp. 155
5.5a Growth factors and their receptorsp. 156
5.5b Nonreceptor tyrosine kinasesp. 161
5.5c GTP-binding proteins: ras activationp. 162
5.5d Cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinasesp. 163
5.5e Suppression of ras signalingp. 165
5.5f Nuclear signalingp. 165
5.5g Transcriptional activationp. 166
5.6 Regulation of DNA synthesis and the cell cyclep. 168
5.7 Other mechanisms for the regulation of signalingp. 171
5.8 Mechanisms of oncogene activationp. 173
5.9 Carcinogens and oncogene activationp. 178
5.10 Oncogene cooperationp. 179
5.11 Normal cells suppress tumor growthp. 180
5.12 Angiogenesis and tumor developmentp. 180
5.13 Tumor Suppressor genesp. 181
5.13a The Rb locusp. 183
5.13b p53 suppressor genep. 184
5.13c Other tumor suppressorsp. 187
5.13d Apoptosis and its role in growth regulationp. 188
5.13e Senescencep. 191
5.14 Where pathology meets molecular biologyp. 192
5.15 Summaryp. 193
6 Cancer in nonhuman organismsp. 195
6.1 Introductionp. 196
6.2 Plant growthsp. 197
6.3 Invertebrate animalsp. 200
Box: Yoshio Masuip. 202
6.4 Cancer in selected ectothermic (cold-blooded) vertebratesp. 203
6.4a Fishp. 204
6.4b Amphibiap. 207
6.4c Reptilesp. 212
Box: John C. Harshbargerp. 214
6.5 Cancer in selected warm-blooded vertebratesp. 215
6.5a Birdsp. 215
6.5b Mammalsp. 216
6.6 Summary - But try anyway!p. 220
7 Epidemiologyp. 221
7.1 Introductionp. 221
7.2 Cancer in fossil humans: A brief digression concerning paleopathologyp. 226
7.3 Epidemiology of selected human cancersp. 226
7.3a Lung cancerp. 227
Box: Alton Ochsnerp. 229
Box: Richard Dollp. 231
7.3b Breast cancerp. 233
7.3c Skin cancerp. 236
7.3d Prostate cancerp. 239
7.3e Colorectal cancerp. 241
7.3f Cervical cancer: "The Beginning of the End"p. 243
7.3g Hodgkin lymphomap. 244
7.4 Occupational cancersp. 244
7.5 AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcomap. 245
7.6 What is next?p. 246
8 Lifestyle: Is there anything more important?p. 248
8.1 Introductionp. 248
8.2 Lung cancer is a preventable diseasep. 249
8.3 Ultraviolet radiation and that "healthy tan"p. 251
8.3a How to minimize risk for skin cancerp. 252
8.3b The peculiar status of protection by sunscreensp. 253
8.4 Diet, nutrition, and cancerp. 253
8.4a Dietary fiber and colorectal cancerp. 255
Box: Denis Burkittp. 256
8.4b Correlations between food substances and cancer prevalence: Significancep. 258
8.4c Dietary fat and obesityp. 258
8.4d Vitamins and cancerp. 259
8.4e Selenium and calciump. 260
8.4f Non-nutrient organic compounds in food that may protect against cancerp. 260
8.4g American Cancer Society (2002) Guidelines on Diet, Nutrition, and Cancer Preventionp. 262
8.5 Exercise as it relates to cancerp. 263
8.6 A special note about breast cancerp. 263
8.7 Other lifestyle hazardsp. 264
8.8 Summaryp. 264
9 The stem cell basis of cancer treatment: concepts and clinical outcomesp. 266
9.1 Introductionp. 266
9.1a Therapies remaining at the conceptual levelp. 266
9.1b Therapies being explored clinically: Differentiation therapy and cytostatic therapyp. 267
Box: Leland Hartwell, R. Timothy Hunt, and Sir Paul Nursep. 269
9.1c Eradicating cancer cells - the aim of current cancer therapyp. 271
9.2 Absolute versus fractional cytoreductionp. 273
Box: Howard Skipperp. 275
9.3 The meaning of "curing cancer" depends on whom you askp. 279
9.4 The biological basis of multimodality therapy as optimal cancer treatmentp. 282
9.5 Biological factors that contribute to treatment successp. 289
Box: H. Rodney Withersp. 291
9.6 Biological factors that contribute to treatment failurep. 293
9.7 Treatment of intermediate-stage breast cancer as a clinical science success storyp. 301
9.8 Summaryp. 305
10 Oncology: The difficult task of eradicating caricatures of normal tissue renewal in the human patientp. 307
10.1 Surgical oncologyp. 308
10.2 Radiation oncologyp. 311
10.3 Chemotherapyp. 314
10.3a Directly cytotoxic chemotherapy drugsp. 314
10.3b Reactive chemicals as cytotoxic anticancer drugsp. 315
10.3c Selective cytotoxicity as a screening tool to discover more cytotoxic drugsp. 315
10.3d Indirect tumor cytotoxicity by nutrient deprivation ("antimetabolite therapy")p. 317
Box: George H. Hitchings, Jr., and Gertrude B. Elionp. 318
Box: Charles Brenton Hugginsp. 329
10.3e Trophic factor therapy to treat hematologic side effects of chemotherapyp. 341
10.3f Therapy that exploits differentiation processes in malignanciesp. 342
10.4 Pharmacological issues arising from tumor biologyp. 349
10.5 Unknowns, the future, and the emergence of molecular oncologyp. 353
Appendix Description of selected tumorsp. 355
A.1 Adenocarcinoma of the breastp. 355
A.2 Adenocarcinoma of the prostatep. 358
A.3 Adenocarcinoma of the colonp. 359
A.4 Squamous cell carcinomap. 361
A.5 Teratocarcinomasp. 365
A.6 Liver cell carcinomap. 370
A.7 Lung cancerp. 370
A.8 Malignant melanomap. 372
A.9 Retinoblastomap. 374
A.10 Neuroblastomap. 374
A.11 Wilms tumor (nephroblastoma)p. 375
A.12 Sarcomasp. 377
A.13 Lymphoma and leukemiap. 378
Glossaryp. 381
Referencesp. 401
Indexp. 469