Cover image for Moonbear's dream
Title:
Moonbear's dream
Author:
Asch, Frank.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations; 24 cm
Summary:
When Moonbear and his friend Little Bird see a kangaroo in the backyard, they think they must be dreaming, so they do things they would not do if they were awake.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
290 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 32442.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 18932 Guided reading level: J.
ISBN:
9780689822445
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When Bear and Little Bird see a kangaroo for the very first time they can't believe their eyes. They must be dreaming! Bear and Little Bird know they could wake themselves up with a pinch, but first they decide to have some fun. Bear eats all the honey he was saving for winter, and Little Bird eats all his birdseed. Then they have a mess party. Soon it looks like their dream is going to turn into a nightmare! And what about that kangaroo?

The lovable Moonbear returns in an imaginative story that will have readers laughing out loud.


Author Notes

Frank Asch was born on August 6, 1946, in Somerville, NJ. In 1969 he graduated from Cooper Union in New York City with a Bachelor's of Fine Arts. Since then he has taught in both the United States and abroad. He has also organized art, writing, puppetry, and creative dramatics workshops for children all over the country.

In 1976 Mr. Asch and his wife started their own children's theatre called The Belly Buttons. In l989, Frank Asch and Vladimir Vagin published Here Comes the Cat!, the first Russian/American collaboration on a children's book, which has since received the Russian National Book Award. Mr. Asch also joined forces with naturalist and photographer Ted Levin for a series of poetry books for children. In 1996, their first book, Sawgrass Poems, was named to the John Burroughs List of Nature Books for Young Readers. Like a Windy Day was released in fall 2002. It was the fourth and last book in the "element" book series that already includes The Earth and I, Water, and The Sun Is My Favorite Star.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Age 3^-6. Unbeknownst to Moonbear and Little Bird, a kangaroo and her joey have escaped from the zoo and have bounced into Moonbear's yard. The two friends mistakenly think they must be dreaming (because why else would a kangaroo be hopping there?) and decide to make the most of their new, dreamlike state. Moonbear and Little Bird begin their adventure by eating all their stockpiled honey and birdseed, and then, delighting in this mischief, they mess up Moonbear's house. They don't have to suffer the consequences because they only need to pinch themselves to wake up! Asch humorously wraps up the story by introducing the zookeeper, who creates order out of the chaos. Asch's familiar restrained illustrations, computer-generated in Photoshop, neatly reflect the story's understated humor and the beloved silliness of Moonbear's world. This title will be welcomed by fans of the earlier books about Moonbear and his friends. --Kathy Broderick


Publisher's Weekly Review

Moonbear and Little Bird think they're dreaming when they see a kangaroo (escaped from the zoo) hopping across the yard, in the ursine hero's latest caper. Ages 2-6. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-A book that will please some of Asch's fans while perplexing others. The unlikely sight of a kangaroo hopping past their house convinces Bear and Little Bird that they must be dreaming. When his feathered friend suggests that they wake themselves up, Bear says, "Why not have some fun first?" So, they eat their food stores, make a mess, and go for a swim. In the meantime, a zookeeper comes searching and finds the escaped kangaroo wandering in the disheveled house. Believing she must be responsible for the mess, the zookeeper, depicted as a pig, quickly sets everything straight. Bear and Little Bird return home, happy (but not surprised) to find normalcy restored. They settle down for a nap, exhausted from their "dream" adventures. As always, Asch's illustrations are childlike and charming. Soft colors and rounded shapes emphasize the coziness of Bear's home. Visual jokes include showing the escaped kangaroo through Bear's window as the friends settle down for their (real) nap at the end. Young children will enjoy the opportunity to revisit familiar characters; for some young listeners, however, the question of whether the story is in fact dream or reality may cause confusion. Libraries in which the series is particularly popular may wish to add this title while others will want to wait for the next installment in hopes of a more straightforward and satisfying story.-Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.