Cover image for Talking about bullying
Title:
Talking about bullying
Author:
Powell, Jillian.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Austin : Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Explains how, why, when, and where people get bullied as well as who does the bullying and what can be done about it.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780817255350
Format :
Book

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LB3013.3 .P68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB3013.3 .P68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB3013.3 .P68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB3013.3 .P68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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LB3013.3 .P68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Sensitively written and honestly presented, this series is a reader's guide to surviving tough times. Difficult topics are handled candidly, but always with a child's best interest at heart. Each title introduces a pressing social issue, addresses a child's concerns, and offers possible steps for resolution. Notes for parents and teachers suggest ways to approach the topic and exercises to elicit further discussion.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-3, younger for reading aloud. Clear explanations of troublesome topics are always welcome in the library, and books in the Talking about series offer just that. With large pages, large typeface, big color photographs, and short, simple sentences, the books are targeted to the primary grades. Teachers wanting to approach a subject can also use them with groups. The writing is kindly and full of common sense and offers a moral point of view: "It is wrong to ignore people who are disabled or to call them names." The book on bullying acknowledges the difficulties and offers sound advice, such as sticking with other people. Each title in the series has a double-page spread at the back of "Notes for Parents and Teachers," giving concrete tips for starting discussions and helping children in these difficult situations. The books also include a brief glossary and a reading list. --Susan Dove Lempke


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Powell defines bullying and discusses why children become bullies, how it feels both to victim and victimizer, and why children often don't seek help. "It is never your fault if you get bullied," she informs children, thus offering positive reassurances and good advice. While there are numerous fiction offerings on this subject, little nonfiction is available at this reading level and this one would make an effective extension of picture books such as Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's King of the Playground (Atheneum, 1991). Equally reassuring and helpful information is provided in Family Breakup, which defines a family as "...people loving and caring for each other." Responding to such stress-producing questions as why families break up, who you can talk to, where will you live, and what a stepfamily is, Powell deals with most of the initial concerns of children whose families are breaking up. While her answers occasionally seem a bit simplistic, she is right on target in what young readers in this situation would be asking, and she provides a broad stroke of answers, suggestions, and positive direction. With their picture-book size, glossy paper, large print, and crisp color photographs of racially diverse young people and adults, these attractive packages give good information on tough topics.-Rosie Peasley, Empire Union School District, Modesto, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.