Cover image for Patriot sage : George Washington and the American political tradition
Title:
Patriot sage : George Washington and the American political tradition
Author:
Gregg, Gary L., 1967-
Publication Information:
Wilmington, Del. : ISI Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
xiv, 355 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1450 Lexile.
ISBN:
9781882926381
Format :
Book

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E312 .P37 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

This illustrated volume commemorates the life and legacy of America's Founding Father by bringing noteworthy scholars and authors together for a timely and topical consideration of Washington's enduring importance.


Author Notes

Forrest McDonald was born in Orange, Texas on January 7, 1927. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin and received a doctorate there in 1955. He taught history at Brown University, Wayne State University, and the University of Alabama, where he retired in 2002. He wrote more than a dozen books including Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Intellectual Origins of the Constitution, The American Presidency: An Intellectual History, and biographies of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. He died of heart failure on January 19, 2016 at the age of 89.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

These three volumes are part of the nation's commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Washington's death. Hannaford's and Murray's books are slight both in size and substance. In The Essential George Washington, Hannaford has collected verbal "snapshots," brief comments on Washington made by sundry poets, politicians, journalists, and others, including Abigail Adams, James Fenimore Cooper, Newt Gingrich, and George Will. Murray's Washington's Farewell takes as its starting point a December 4, 1783, meeting of Washington and his officers, at which he bade farewell to his men and prepared to return to private life. Murray sketches the lives and characters of the officers who were at this convocation and discusses Washington's military career. Both books tend toward hagiography, and Patriot Sage is not far off. It opens with a preface by William J. Bennett, former Secretary of Education, U.S. drug czar, and chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, which states the conservative agenda of the essays collection: because the United States is in moral and political decline, it behooves us to emulate Washington in our public and private lives. The book's 12 essays touch on most facets of Washington's life--his management of Mount Vernon, his military strategies and tactics, his forging of the presidency, and his trustworthy character. One of the strongest essays is by Richard Brookhiser, author of one of the best recent biographies of Washington (Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington, LJ 2/1/96). His prose is so buoyant it nearly leaps from the page. Unfortunately, none of these three books represents a significant advance in our knowledge or appreciation of our first president. Readers interested in Washington are advised to consult books like Brookhiser's. Patriot Sage is recommended for larger public libraries; the Murray and Hannaford books are not essential purchases.--Thomas J. Schaeper, St. Bonaventure Univ., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. vi
Forewordp. ix
Introductionp. 1
1 Today's Indispensable Manp. 23
2 """"The Western Cincinnatus"""": Washington as Farmer and Soldierp. 39
3 General Washington and the Military Strategy of the Revolutionp. 61
4 George Washington and the Standing Oakp. 99
5 Washington and the Origins of Presidential Powerp. 123
6 Foreign Policy and the First Commander in Chiefp. 141
7 The Symbolic Dimensions of the First Presidencyp. 165
8 Washington's Farewell Address and the Form of the American Regimep. 199
9 Making Citizens: George Washington and the American Characterp. 217
10 """"Our Illustrious Washington"""": the American Imaging of George Washingtonp. 241
11 George Washington and the Religious Impulsep. 267
12 Eulogy on Washington: """"First in the Hearts of His Countrymen""""p. 287
Afterword: The Forgotten Character of George Washingtonp. 299
Notes on Contributorsp. 309
Notesp. 315
Indexp. 341