Cover image for Dr. Seuss goes to war : the World War II editorial cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel
Title:
Dr. Seuss goes to war : the World War II editorial cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel
Author:
Minear, Richard H.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : New Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
272 pages : illustrations, facsimiles ; 24 cm
General Note:
Political cartoons first published in PM.

"Published in cooperation with the Dr. Seuss Collection at the University of California at San Diego."

Introduction by Art Spiegelman.
Language:
English
Added Uniform Title:
PM (New York, N.Y.)
ISBN:
9781565845657
Format :
Book

Available:*

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D745.2 .M56 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D745.2 .M56 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D745.2 .M56 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D745.2 .M56 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

For decades, readers throughout the world have enjoyed the marvelous stories and illustrations of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. But few know Geisel's work as a political cartoonist during World War II for the New York daily newspaper PM. In these marvelously trenchant cartoons, Geisel captured the Zeitgeist--especially the attitudes of the New Deal liberals who read PM--with a wonderful Seussian flair. Dr. Seuss Goes to War features handsome, large-format reproductions of more than two hundred of Geisel's cartoons from this time. Book jacket.


Author Notes

Richard H. Minear is a professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and one of the country's leading historians of Japan during World War II.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

In this collection of World War II political cartoons, the familiar hand of Dr. Seuss is immediately recognizable in renderings of the American eagle, Charles Lindbergh, Adolph Hitler, and sundry other news makers and symbols of the early '40s. The doctor contributed editorial cartoons during 1941^-43 to PM, "a left-wing daily newspaper published in New York." Given such a provenance, the drawings didn't achieve wide currency. This collection presents 200 of them, notably introduced by Maus-man Art Spiegelman and accompanied by Minear's insightful commentary. Adding significantly to the portion of the Seuss oeuvre not shelved in the children's collection, the book also identifies an important forerunner of a cultural icon--the cat's hat. It first appeared as Uncle Sam's top hat in these wartime cartoons that, as Spiegelman points out, "let us know what happens when Horton hears a heil." --Mike Tribby


Library Journal Review

Few fans of Dr. Seuss's whimsy are likely to be aware that before authoring The Cat in the Hat Theodor Seuss Geisel penned editorial cartoons for the New York daily PM. This new collection presents approximately half the newspaper cartoons that Geisel drafted for the pro-New Deal paper from the start of 1941 (when his main targets were the isolationists who opposed U.S. intervention in European and Asian affairs) until 1943 (when he accepted a commission in the U.S. Army). Minear (history, Univ. of Massachusetts) has done a fine job of selecting, arranging in thematic order, and providing historical commentary for these cartoons, which are full of Geisel's expected visual wit; seeing the early development of his eccentric animal menagerie is a special treat. As Art Spiegelman notes in his introduction, Geisel's Uncle Sam seems to have been practice for what would become the Cat in the Hat. "The prototype for the cat's famous headgear is actually...Uncle Sam's red-and-white-striped top hat! The Cat in the Hat is America!" writes Spiegelman. Recommended for larger libraries.ÄKent Worcester, Marymount Manhattan Coll., New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introduction: Art Spiegelmanp. 6
Some Important Datesp. 8
Dr. Seuss and PMp. 9
The Home Frontp. 17
Hitler and Nazi Germanyp. 73
The Rest of the Worldp. 115
Winning The Warp. 183
Concluding Thoughtsp. 259
Acknowledgments and Sourcesp. 267
Chronological Listing of Cartoonsp. 268