Cover image for Young Jesus of Nazareth
Title:
Young Jesus of Nazareth
Author:
Mayer, Marianna.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Presents a picture of the early life of Jesus and the signs that revealed him as a very extraordinary child.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688140618

9780688140625

9780688167288
Format :
Book

Available:*

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BT320 .M35 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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BT320 .M35 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

An account of the life of the Virgin Mary, from her own birth through her early years and education at the Temple to the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem.


Author Notes

Marianna Mayer published her first book, Beauty and the Beast, at the age of nineteen. After college, she studied painting at the Art Students League in New York City. She eventually transitioned to writing. Her works include The Unicorn Alphabet, Marcel the Pastry Chef, Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the Brave, and The Adventures of Tom Thumb.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 3-5, younger for reading aloud. The Bible tells us very little about the childhood of Mary, mother of Jesus, so Mayer embellishes. She writes in her author's note (small print; child readers unlikely) that she has included "writings of the early saints and mystics" and "certain incidents drawn from my imagination" as well as "tales passed on from the nuns of Saint Joseph," Mayer's convent school. This makes for a lively tale, in which Mary heals an injured bird, has conversations with the priests at the Temple, and cures the fever of a young friend. The events are beautifully illustrated with paintings by the Masters, each carefully chosen and vividly reproduced. It is not uncommon for writers to mix fact and fiction when writing about the lives of saints, no matter what their religion. But Mayer takes this concept a little far by not specifically sourcing her material and by throwing her own embellishments into the mix. A handsome offering that might fit more comfortably on folklore shelves than in the 200s. (Reviewed October 1, 1998)0688140610Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Citing sources from the Gospels, the Apocrypha and early saints/mystics' writings, Mayer (The Unicorn and the Lake) fills in the details before the virgin birth. Mayer includes the well-known tales of when Mary heals a bird and a sick girl as well as the renown she gains from her good works at the temple. Aside from these additions to the biblical account of Mary's life, the author creates an interesting perspective of Mary and the girl/woman she might have been. Mayer opens this interpretation with Mary's plea to God for a child from her barren mother, Anna; when the promised child arrives, Anna and Joachim's lives are forever changed and blessed. Young Mary's kindness and wisdom impress all who meet her, astounding even the most learned of temple teachers with her insights. Her eventual betrothal to the elderly widower Joseph foreshadows her part in conceiving and bringing forth the Messiah Jesus. The account of Mary's early life reads fluidly and evenly, and the artistic reproductions from masters such as Rosetti, Giotto, Titian and Barocci contribute to a well-rounded portrayal of this essential personage in Christianity. All ages. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 6-Happily for readers, if unhappily for struggling artists, several recent picture books on myths and religious figures utilize fine-art paintings as illustrations. This very personal vision of the early life of the Virgin is the latest example. Mayer draws on apocryphal material and her own psychological insights as well as Scripture for her account of Mary's conception, birth, education, betrothal, and, finally, the birth of her son. Some touches of the miraculous gild the narrative, but for the most part the author focuses on Mary's qualities of character-in particular, her courage. A note at the end gives sources, but there is no way to sort canonical from noncanonical bits in the story. The illustrations are equally personal choices. From Mark Lancelot Symons's angelic chorus of very realistic 1920's faces featured on the book jacket onward, well-known artists (Lippi, Giotto, Titian, La Tour) accompany those who are lesser known (Salimbeni, Barocci, Ligozzi). Mayer chooses many Baroque, Pre-Raphaelite, and pre-Raphael works over the predictable High Renaissance icons. This is a book for devout, and chiefly Catholic, readers, though others may appreciate its model of a strong young woman, or its lovely reproductions.-Patricia Lothrop-Green, St. George's School, Newport, RI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.