Cover image for Jack and the beanstalk
Title:
Jack and the beanstalk
Author:
Beneduce, Ann Keay.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Philomel Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A boy climbs to the top of a giant beanstalk, where he uses his quick wits to outsmart an ogre and make his and his mother's fortune.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.6 0.5 34651.
Genre:
Added Author:
Added Uniform Title:
Jack and the beanstalk. English.
ISBN:
9780399231186
Format :
Book

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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.B4235 JAC 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

A boy climbs to the top of a giant beanstalk, where he uses his quick wits to outsmart an ogre and make his and his mother's fortune.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 6^-8. Beneduce bases her version of Jack and the Beanstalk on a Victorian version, complete with a fairy guardian. It is the fairy who takes credit for the beanstalk's wondrous growth and gives Jack moral justification for killing the giant by saying, "This wicked creature killed your father and stole all his riches. The giant warned your poor mother never to tell you anything about your father or how he died, or he would murder her, and you, too . . . It is up to you to avenge your father and to take back what is rightfully yours." The book is lengthened, but not strengthened by Jack's encounter with the fairy--two full pages of stop-the-action, fill-in-the-background text. Still, this long variant of the tale is graceful and dramatic enough apart from that episode. Spirin contributes some glorious borders for the text as well as many impressively detailed paintings, notable for their dark, muted colors and mysterious, foggy look. Recommended for larger collections. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Spirin's (The Sea King's Daughter) breathtaking illustrations for this retelling are so engrossing that readers may notice the fluidity of the text almost as an afterthought. His watercolor and tempera paintings have a hazy yet magisterially detailed look that seems to jump straight out of fairyland. The style in places suggest the earthy qualities and village scenes of Brueghel, but Spirin maintains his characteristic delicacy of line. Lavish borders offer careful still lives of rich cheeses, crusty breads and roasted meats or show tidy curving vines of bean plants. In full-scale illustrations, Spirin emphasizes the giant's monstrous physicality√Ąhis bulbous nose and profusely curling whiskers make him seem grossly sensual and quite capable of eating Jack alive. Beneduce (The Tempest) models the text on an 1881 version that gives Jack motivation for tormenting the giant: he is avenging his father's death. Readers old enough to appreciate the complexities of the art will similarly enjoy this less familiar and more complicated rendition of a favorite tale. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-Beneduce and Spirin have previously paired their talents for Gulliver's Adventures in Lilliput (1996), The Tempest (1996), and Snow White and Rose Red (1997, all Philomel). Here they turn their hand to what is perhaps the most well known of the Jack tales. Beneduce has a fine command of the language, and the narrative flows smoothly. Spirin's watercolor-and-tempera paintings are nothing less than gorgeous, using dark, soft tones to create a misty fairy-tale world. Beneduce has, however, elected to use a version of the tale that supplies Jack with the moral prerogative to steal the giant's treasures. Partway up the beanstalk, Jack meets a fairy who informs him that it was this particular giant who killed Jack's father and stole the family fortune, and it is now his duty to avenge these wrongs. As a result, this Jack may hold less appeal for some readers. He is no longer a bold adventurer who uses wit and cunning to triumph over brainless brawn but is instead a good little boy who is only following orders. Those expecting the cheeky lad found in Joseph Jacobs's 1898 collection of English fairy tales will be disappointed. Those who are more comfortable with Jack possessed of righteous justification are in for a treat. Beneduce includes an expository note detailing the historical background of the Jack cycle as well as her own reasons for preferring this rather didactic version of the tale.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.