Cover image for The American crow and the common raven
Title:
The American crow and the common raven
Author:
Kilham, Lawrence, 1910-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2000.

©1989
Physical Description:
xiv, 255 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780890963777
Format :
Book

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QL696.P2367 K55 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Drawing on his own experiences in Florida and New England, with reference to published literature, Kilham describes many hitherto unknown aspects of the behavior of crows and ravens. He particularly emphasizes the cooperation in food gathering (some call it theft) and storage, breeding, nesting, and defense. Includes wonderful drawings by Joan Waltermire. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

The American crow and the common raven are among the most intelligent species of birds in the world. Their remarkable behaviors are reviewed and discussed with a rich assortment of ancedotes from the author's 8,000 hours of field observations. Lawrence Kilham, whose profession is medicine, is a distinguished ornithologist by avocation, with many publications on avian behavior (mostly about woodpeckers and crows). This book, explains especially, the social systems of these birds, from cooperative breeding to predator mobbing. Difficult topics such as "play" and "thinking" in crows are interestingly and critically presented. The style is readable, yet the quality is very professional and up to date on ecological and behavioral themes. Attractive black-and-white drawings illustrate the text; physically this is an appealing volume except for excessively large outer margins. As a valuable contribution to the field of bird behavior it is recommended for undergraduate and graduate students, in addition to its wider popular audience. -C. Leck, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey