Cover image for Looking at Italian Renaissance sculpture
Title:
Looking at Italian Renaissance sculpture
Author:
McHam, Sarah Blake.
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xvi, 287 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The materials and techniques of Italian Renaissance sculpture / G.M. Helms -- The revival of antiquity in early Renaissance sculpture / H.W. Janson -- On the sources and meaning of the Renaissance portrait bust / Irving Lavin -- Familiar objects : sculptural types in the collections of the early Medici / John T. Paoletti -- Holy dolls : play and piety in Florence in the Quattrocento / Christiane Klapisch-Zuber -- The virtue of littleness : small-scale sculptures of the Italian Renaissance / Joy Kenseth -- Public sculpture in Renaissance Florence / Sarah Blake McHam -- Looking at Renaissance sculpture with Vasari / Paul Barolsky -- A week in the life of Michelangelo / William E. Wallace -- Michelangelo : sculpture, sex, and gender / James M. Saslow -- Gendered nature and its representation in sixteenth-century garden sculpture / Claudia Lazzaro.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780521473668

9780521479219
Format :
Book

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NB615 .L66 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Looking at Italian Renaissance Sculpture offers provocative insights into the sculpture produced primarily in Florence but in other regions as well, during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Focusing on the achievements of such artists as Donatello and Michelangelo, this volume demonstrates how the methodologies of cultural anthropology, aesthetics, conservation, political theory, and literary analysis, among others, can be successfully applied to the study of sculpture. Among the themes explored in this collection of essays, many written specially for this edition and others revised and updated, are the relationship of sculpture to nature, as well as to the cultures of Greece and Rome; the role of patronage; the development of new forms, such as the statuettes and portraiture; and the creation of public monuments as vehicles of propaganda. Also emphasized are the techniques of creating sculpture in a variety of media, including bronze, marble, wood, stucco, and terracotta.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This carefully conceived volume--richer than its title suggests--aims to extend the ways in which we think about Italian Renaissance sculpture. The editor has brought together a group of 11 superb essays that, in an array of methodologies, make the case for sculpture as one of the more fruitful areas of investigation in Renaissance art. Two previously published classics of the field--by H. W. Janson and Irving Lavin--are included, joined by more recent analyses that range from studies of technique, genres of production, and objects of personal piety to the intermingling of male and female references in Italian garden design. The footnotes are a bibliographical goldmine, providing a road map to newly opened areas of investigation in Renaissance art generally. One of the important themes, stressed in a number of the essays, is that valuable information can be gleaned from modest works by anonymous craftsmen as well as from the dazzling virtuoso pieces by famous artists. Both students and experienced scholars will profit from the new charting of the field that is laid out here. Undergraduates through faculty. D. Pincus; National Gallery of Art


Table of Contents

1 IntroductionSarah Blake McHam
2 The materials and techniques of Italian Renaissance sculptureG. M. Helms
3 The revival of antiquity in early Renaissance sculptureH. W. Janson
4 On the sources and meaning of the Renaissance portrait bustIrving Lavin
5 Familiar objects: sculptural types in the collections of the early MediciJohn T. Paoletti
6 Holy dolls: play and piety in Florence in the QuattrocentoChristiane Klapisch-Zuber
7 The virtue of littleness: small-scale sculptures of the Italian RenaissanceJoy Kenseth
8 Public sculpture in Renaissance FlorenceSarah Blake McHam
9 Looking at Renaissance sculpture with VasariPaul Barolsky
10 A week in the life of MichelangeloWilliam E. Wallace
11 Michelangelo: sculpture, sex, and genderJames M. Saslow
12 Gendered nature and its representation in sixteenth-century garden sculptureClaudia Lazzaro
Selected bibliography