Cover image for Norman Rockwell : pictures for the American people
Title:
Norman Rockwell : pictures for the American people
Author:
Rockwell, Norman, 1894-1978.
Publication Information:
Atlanta, Ga. : High Museum of Art ; Stockbridge, Mass. : Norman Rockwell Museum ; New York, N.Y. : Harry N. Abrams, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
199 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 30 cm
General Note:
Catalog of the exhibition held at High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Nov. 6, 1999-Jan. 30, 2000 and 6 other museums, Feb. 26, 2000-Feb. 11, 2002.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780810963924
Format :
Book

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ND237.R68 A4 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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ND237.R68 A4 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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ND237.R68 A4 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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ND237.R68 A4 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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ND237.R68 A4 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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ND237.R68 A4 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Contributors from a wide range of fields - including leading art historians, cultural commentators, a child psychiatrist and a graphic designer - shed light on the complexity of Rockwell's art, and his place in mass media imagery.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Even if you think there are already enough Norman Rockwell books, by all means look at this accompaniment to a major touring exhibition of Rockwell's art--incredibly enough, the first--that travels for two years from Atlanta to Chicago, Washington, San Diego, Phoenix, back to the artworks' home in the Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Connecticut, and then to the Guggenheim in New York. Not only are plenty of the paintings nicely reproduced, but 14 essays (one by Rockwell's sculptor son, Peter) discuss the artist, his appeal and influence, and particular paintings, such as, especially well, The Connoisseur, in which a businessman looks at a very passable imitation Jackson Pollock abstraction. The aura of the whole project is not trendily "retro" but respectful and attentive to the issues of popular as opposed to critically approved art. --Ray Olson


Library Journal Review

Excellent writing is the hallmark of this catalog of an upcoming exhibit, traveling throughout the country for the next several years. Fourteen essays by art historians and academics address broad themes, specific issues (such as school desegregation), and the critical fortunes of Rockwell's work--without preconceptions or prejudgments. Like Rockwell's art itself, the catalog is clearly organized and accessible, and like his art, the essays are thoughtful and repay close reading. Although brief, these essays are also of uniformly high quality. Icon that he was, it is now possible to look at Rockwell's work in historical context; this book, edited by two museum curators, succeeds thoroughly in this regard. An outstanding companion to Norman Rockwell: 332 Magazine Covers, which reproduced all of his Saturday Evening Post covers, this is highly recommended for general and art historical collections.--Jack Perry Brown, Art Inst. of Chicago Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

YA-This collection of essays forms the catalog of the exhibition of Rockwell's work traveling to seven U.S. cities. It explores the artist's goals, achievements, and legacy as well as his role and stature in American art. Some essays effuse praise, some give anecdotal yet enlightening information about Rockwell's subjects, and some offer in-depth, scholarly analyses of his works. Because the book presents writings by a variety of curators and critics, information is repeated and often opinions are flatly contradicted. The variety of interpretations of Rockwell's style and work shows a complexity in a collection often viewed as simple and sentimental. Even so, the book's true strength lies in the 133 full-color plates and illustrations that document Rockwell's progress as illustrator, painter, and storyteller. A delight for casual observers and students of art and art history.-Vivien Jewell, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This catalog of a traveling exhibition organized by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta has 156 illustrations with 133 in full color on heavy, coated paper. It includes essays by 15 leading historians, curators, art historians, and critics including Karal Ann Marling (author of a very similar 1997 catalog Norman Rockwell, also published by Abrams). In addition to Marling, essayists include Thomas Hoving, Wanda M. Corn, Steven Heller, Robert Rosenblum, Ned Rifkin, Laurie Moffatt, and Hennessey and Knutson, among others. Unlike the earlier Marling, this catalog does not include a bibliography or chronology, but it does include a greater variety of essays and good notes to the essays. Both of the recent catalogs (Hennessey and Marling) contain better text and reproductions than the 1972 volume Norman Rockwell: A Sixty Year Retrospective, with text by Thomas S. Buechner (CH, Apr'73) and are welcome updates on the Rockwell literature. This catalog reassesses Rockwell's artistic reputation by showing how his paintings helped to forge a national identity and to influence our perceptions of this past century. It will find use among generalists as well as professionals interested in the art of illustration. All levels. C. Stroh; Western Michigan University