Cover image for Constitutional rights of prisoners
Title:
Constitutional rights of prisoners
Author:
Palmer, John W., 1933-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Sixth edition.
Publication Information:
Cincinnati, OH : Anderson Pub. Co., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiii, 823 pages : map ; 26 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780870842276
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
KF9731.A7 P35 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

After an overview of the judicial system, chapters cover ongoing issues in prisoner's rights and prison litigation, detailing areas including use of force, religion in prison, legal services, use of mail and telephone, civil and criminal liabilities of prison officials, and medical treatment. Includes some 400 pages of significant cases. This edition adds a new chapter on The Prison Litigation Reform Act of 1996, the text of which has been added as an appendix. This edition also features a new case, reflecting the conservative opinions of the present Supreme Court. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 An Overview of the Judicial Systemp. 1
1.1 Introductionp. 3
1.2 The American Common Lawp. 4
1.2.1 Equity as Part of the Common Lawp. 5
1.2.2 The Role of Case Lawp. 6
1.3 The American Court Structurep. 8
1.3.1 The Trialp. 10
1.3.2 The Appealp. 12
1.4 Anatomy of a Casep. 13
1.4.1 Citationsp. 13
1.5 Conclusionp. 15
Chapter 2 Use of Force; Use of Corporal Punishment to Enforce Prison Disciplinep. 19
2.1 Introductionp. 21
2.2 Degree of Force Permittedp. 22
2.3 Self-Defensep. 25
2.4 Defense of Third Personsp. 27
2.4 Enforcement of Prison Rules and Regulationsp. 27
2.6 Prevention of Crimep. 28
2.7 Prevention of Escapep. 29
2.8 The Use of Corporal Punishment to Enforce Prison Disciplinep. 29
2.8.1 Brief History of Corporal Punishmentp. 29
2.8.2 Is Corporal Punishment Rational?p. 30
2.8.3 Judicial Treatment of Corporal Punishmentp. 31
2.8.4 Alternatives to Corporal Punishmentp. 33
2.9 Conclusionp. 33
Chapter 3 Prisoners' Rights to Visitation/Association; Searchesp. 35
3.1 Introductionp. 37
3.2 Pretrial Detaineesp. 39
3.3 Communication Among Prisoners and Union Formationp. 40
3.4 Conjugal Visitationp. 42
3.5 News Media Interviewsp. 43
3.6 Attorney Representativesp. 46
3.7 Searches of Visitorsp. 47
3.8 Searches of Prisonersp. 49
3.9 Conclusionp. 50
Chapter 4 Prisoners' Rights to Use of the Mail and Telephonep. 51
4.1 Introductionp. 53
4.2 The General Right to Control an Inmate's Use of the Mail System--The Traditional Approachp. 54
4.2.1 The New Approachp. 55
4.3 Communication with the Courtsp. 58
4.3.1 Censorship of Communication with the Courtsp. 59
4.4 Communication with Attorneysp. 59
4.4.1 Censorship of Communication with Attorneysp. 60
4.5 Communication with Non-Judicial Public Officials and Agenciesp. 61
4.6 Communication with News Media--Inmates' Right to Use the Mail to Contact News Mediap. 63
4.7 Communication with Inmates in Other Institutionsp. 64
4.8 Receipt of Inflammatory Materialp. 65
4.9 Receipt of Obscene Materialp. 67
4.10 Receipt of Racially Oriented Newspapers and Magazinesp. 68
4.11 Use of Mail Listsp. 69
4.12 Receipt of Books and Packages from Outside Sourcesp. 70
4.13 Use of the Telephonep. 71
4.14 Conclusionp. 73
Chapter 5 Isolated Confinement--"The Hole"p. 75
5.1 Introductionp. 77
5.2 Intervention by the Courtsp. 77
5.3 Application of the Eighth Amendmentp. 78
5.3.1 Constitutionality of the Use of Isolated Confinementp. 78
5.3.2 Constitutionality of the Conditions of Isolated Confinementp. 79
5.3.3 The Purpose of Isolated Confinementp. 86
5.3.4 Punishment Proportional to the Offensep. 87
5.4 Conclusionp. 87
Chapter 6 Religion in Prisonp. 89
6.1 Introduction: Effect of Imprisonment on Religious Rightsp. 91
6.2 Restrictions on the Free Exercise of Religionp. 93
6.2.1 Restrictions Based on the Maintenance of Discipline or Securityp. 94
6.2.2 Restrictions Based on the Exercise of Authority and Official Discretionp. 96
6.2.3 Restrictions Based on Economic Considerationsp. 99
6.3 Religious Discrimination: The Equal Protection Clausep. 102
6.4 Specific Areas of Constitutional Concernp. 104
6.4.1 The Right to Hold Religious Servicesp. 105
6.4.2 The Wearing of Religious Medalsp. 107
6.4.3 The Right to Correspond with Religious Leadersp. 108
6.4.4 The Right to Proselytizep. 108
6.4.5 Free Access to Ministersp. 109
6.4.6 Restrictions of Dietp. 110
6.4.7 Access to Religious Literaturep. 112
6.4.8 Classification on Religious Groundsp. 115
6.4.9 Beards and Haircutsp. 116
6.4.10 Religious Freedom Restoration Actp. 118
6.5 Conclusionp. 122
Chapter 7 Legal Servicesp. 123
7.1 Introduction: Access to the Courts as a Constitutional Rightp. 125
7.2 The Nature of Legal Services in Prison--Prevailing Practicesp. 127
7.3 The Rule of Johnson v. Averyp. 128
7.3.1 Judicial Interpretation of Johnson v. Averyp. 129
7.4 Which Inmates Are Permitted to Receive Legal Assistance from the Jailhouse Lawyer?p. 130
7.5 Who May Act as the Jailhouse Lawyer?p. 131
7.6 How May Prison Officials Restrict the Jailhouse Lawyer?p. 132
7.7 What Type of Legal Assistance May an Inmate Receive from the Jailhouse Lawyer?p. 134
7.8 What is the Reasonable Alternative to the Jailhouse Lawyer?p. 135
7.9 Access to Legal Materialsp. 138
7.10 Legal Materials That Must Be Supplied by Prison Officialsp. 141
7.11 The Inmate's Right to Counselp. 143
7.12 Retaliation for Exercising Contitutional Rightsp. 144
7.13 Restrictions on Access to the Courtsp. 145
7.14 Conclusionp. 147
Chapter 8 Prison Disciplinary Proceedingsp. 149
8.1 Introductionp. 151
8.2 Due Process of Lawp. 155
8.3 Due Process Requirements in a Prison Disciplinary Hearingp. 156
8.3.1 Notice of the Hearingp. 160
8.3.2 An Opportunity to be Heardp. 161
8.3.3 Right to Counselp. 162
8.3.4 Witnesses; Confrontation; Cross-Examinationp. 163
8.3.5 Administrative Reviewp. 165
8.3.6 The Recordp. 166
8.3.7 Impartialityp. 167
8.3.8 Pre-hearing Detention and Emergenciesp. 168
8.3.9 Double Jeopardyp. 169
8.3.10 Evidencep. 170
8.4 Inmate's Legal Remediesp. 171
8.5 Conclusionp. 171
Chapter 9 Parolep. 173
9.1 Introductionp. 175
9.2 Parole is Not a Rightp. 175
9.3 Parole Revocationp. 186
9.3.1 The Privilege Theoryp. 188
9.3.2 The Contract Theoryp. 188
9.3.3 The Continuing Custody Theoryp. 189
9.3.4 The Due Process Theoryp. 189
9.4 Parole Revocation Proceedingsp. 189
9.4.1 Arrest and Preliminary Hearingp. 193
9.4.2 The Revocation Hearingp. 197
9.4.3 Procedural Due Process at the Revocation Hearingp. 197
9.4.4 The Revocation Hearing--Right to Counselp. 198
9.4.5 The Revocation Hearing--Right to Appointed Counselp. 199
9.4.6 Evidence at the Revocation Hearingp. 200
9.4.7 Rescission of Parolep. 204
9.5 Probationp. 206
9.6 Conditions of Releasep. 207
9.6.1 Free Speech and Conditionsp. 208
9.6.2 Search as a Conditionp. 211
9.7 Conclusionp. 214
Chapter 10 Right to Rehabilitation Programs, Right to Medical Aid, and Right to Lifep. 217
10.1 Introductionp. 219
10.2 Right to Rehabilitation Programsp. 219
10.2.1 Judicial Decisionsp. 219
10.2.2 Analogy of Right to Treatment in Other Areasp. 223
10.2.3 Administrative Reviewp. 225
10.3 Right to Medical Aidp. 226
10.4 Right to Lifep. 235
10.5 Civil Disabilitiesp. 243
10.6 Sex Discriminationp. 246
10.7 Federal Protective Statutesp. 246
10.8 Conclusionp. 248
Chapter 11 Civil and Criminal Liabilities of Prison Officialsp. 251
11.1 Introductionp. 253
11.2 Jurisdiction of Federal Courtsp. 253
11.3 Jurisdiction of State Courtsp. 254
11.4 Barriers to Inmate Lawsuits--Doctrine of Sovereign Immunityp. 255
11.4.1 The Hands-Off Doctrinep. 259
11.5 Federal Remedies--Civil Suits Against Federal Prison Officialsp. 260
11.6 Federal Remedies--Civil Rights Actp. 261
11.6.1 Civil Rights Act--Exhaustion of Remediesp. 269
11.6.2 The Immunity Defensesp. 274
11.6.3 Monetary Damagesp. 283
11.6.4 Attorney Feesp. 285
11.6.5 Injunctive Reliefp. 290
11.6.6 Statute of Limitationsp. 292
11.7 Federal Remedies--Declaratory Judgmentsp. 293
11.8 Federal Remedies--Habeas Corpusp. 294
11.9 Federal Remedies--Criminal Prosecutionp. 298
11.10 Federal Remedies--Contemptp. 299
11.11 State Remedies--Civil Suitsp. 299
11.11.1 Effect of Sovereign Immunityp. 300
11.12 State Remedies--Declaratory Judgmentsp. 301
11.13 State Remedies--Habeas Corpusp. 302
11.14 State Remedies--Criminal Prosecutionp. 302
11.15 State Remedies--Contemptp. 303
11.16 Conclusionp. 303
Chapter 12 Additional Litigationp. 305
12.1 Introductionp. 307
12.2 Classificationp. 307
12.3 Transferp. 311
12.3.1 Extraditionp. 315
12.4 Search and Seizurep. 316
12.5 Overcrowdingp. 320
12.6 Conditions of Confinementp. 321
12.7 Correctional Personnelp. 330
12.8 Rights of Privacyp. 331
12.9 Ex Post Factop. 331
12.10 Conclusionp. 333
Chapter 13 The Prison Litigation Reform Actp. 335
13.1 Introductionp. 337
13.2 Congressional Legislationp. 338
13.2.1 Remedial Discretion is Restrictedp. 339
13.2.2 Abusive Litigation is Restricted and Disincentives to Prisoner Lawsuits Are Providedp. 341
13.2.3 Courts May Dismiss Prisoner Suits and Prisoners Must Exhaust All Administrative Remedies Before Filing Suit in a Federal Court; Claims for Mental or Emotional Injuries are Limitedp. 342
13.2.4 Screening of Casesp. 342
13.3 Litigationp. 343
13.3.1 42 U.S.C. [section] 1915p. 343
13.3.2 42 U.S.C. [section] 1915Ap. 345
13.3.3 42 U.S.C. [section] 1997ep. 346
13.3.4 42 U.S.C. [section] 3626p. 347
13.4 Conclusionp. 349
Chapter 14 Human Rights of Prisoners: A Comparison Study of the European Convention on Human Rightsp. 351
14.1 Introductionp. 353
14.2 Casesp. 355
14.2.1 Searches, Solitary Confinement, and Conditions of Confinementp. 355
14.2.2 Use of Special Disciplinary Proceduresp. 356
14.2.3 Degree of Forcep. 357
14.2.4 Right to Treatmentp. 357
14.2.5 Medical Treatmentp. 358
14.2.6 Practice of Religionp. 358
14.2.7 Contact with the Outside Worldp. 358
14.3 Extraditionp. 359
14.4 Conclusionp. 363
Part II Judicial Decisions Relating to Part Ip. 365
Table of Cases for Part IIp. 367
Appendicesp. 743
I. Constitutional Amendmentsp. 745
II. 42 U.S.C. [section] 1983--Civil Action for Deprivation of Rightsp. 751
III. European Convention on Human Rightsp. 763
IV. European Prison Rulesp. 767
Table of Cases for Part Ip. 785
Indexp. 813