Cover image for Little Miss Spider
Title:
Little Miss Spider
Author:
Kirk, David, 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press/Callaway, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 18 x 24 cm
Summary:
On her very first day of life, Little Miss Spider searches for her mother and finds love in an unexpected place.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 43616.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.3 1 Quiz: 17155 Guided reading level: J.
ISBN:
9780439083898
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction On Display
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When Miss Spider pops out of her egg, surrounded by brothers and sisters scurrying about, her mother is nowhere to be found - but kind Betty the Beetle is there to fill the role. "Just right for preschoolers or beginning readers, this reassuring story, complete with a surprise ending, is a charmer." - School Library Journal


Author Notes

The uncommonly unique imagination of David Kirk has an equally uncommon source. "I found a small copy of The Gnomes' Almanac by a little-known Viennese author Ida Bohtta Morpugo. It was a cutout book simply subtitled: A Book for Children. In it, the pictures and verse about bugs, butterflies, and mice really came to life." That got him drawing and writing. Before that he made children's toys by hand. "I love making stories. The bookmaking process is a liberation for me from the years I toiled to produce handmade items. I think the life of a children's book author is bliss." Kirk lives in upstate New York, with his wife and three daughters.For more information about David Kirk, visit: scholastic.com/tradebooks


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-6. Kirk takes the plump protagonist of Miss Spider's Tea Party (1994) and its sequels back to hatchling days. There being no adult in sight when Little Miss and her many siblings emerge (children familiar with Charlotte's Web will know why), off the spider clambers to track down her mother. Printed on thick high-gloss paper, Kirk's paintings glow with dazzlingly saturated colors, and the gleaming, oversize bug eyes of Miss Spider and the various creatures she encounters on her brief quest will also catch children's attention. In the end, a kindly green beetle named Betty rescues Little Miss from a nest of newborn goldfinches and adopts her--an ending that makes this rhymed episode a horizon-expanding alternative to P. D. Eastman's Are You My Mother? (1960) and other hunts for misplaced parents. --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

In a smaller, simpler format, the latest book about Miss Spider takes readers back to her birth and subsequent search for her mother. This winning tale puts a new spin on the subject, for the just-hatched little Miss Spider never locates her biological mother (fans of Charlotte's Web will know why). Instead, Miss Spider adopts as her mother the green beetle, Betty, who has been assisting Miss Spider in her search all along. As the text explains, "For finding your mother,/ There's one certain test./ You must look for the creature/ Who loves you the best." The pictures of Betty cupping the tiny, dewy-eyed Miss Spider (with a cute oversize head) in her hands and bathing her in a walnut shell are heartwarming. In addition to a happy ending, the book offers danger and adventure: Betty narrowly saves Miss Spider from being fed to gaping-mouthed baby goldfinches. As always, Kirk's oil paintings glow with luminescent colors and, here printed on laminated pages, they closely resemble animation cells. Not only do Miss Spider fans now have a prequel, this tale will likely convert arachnophobes to arachnophiles, at least when it comes to Miss Spider. Ages 4-7. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A prequel to the earlier stories. Here readers meet Miss Spider on the very first day of her life when the little arachnid is quite alarmed that she can't find her mother. "Did she squeeze down a hole?/Or dive underwater?/Why won't she come out here/And meet her new daughter?" With a helpful beetle named Betty by her side, she sets out to locate her missing mom. But, alas, none of the other insects have seen her. Fortunately, Betty comes up with another solution that suits both herself and little spider. Kirk's lively, photo-clear illustrations are, as usual, appealing. The eye-catching yellow spiders, green-and-blue beetle, and red centipedes almost jump off the page with a striking three-dimensional effect. Just right for preschoolers or beginning readers, this reassuring story, complete with a surprise ending, is a charmer.-Rachel Fox, Port Washington Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.