Cover image for How are you peeling : foods with moods
Title:
How are you peeling : foods with moods
Author:
Freymann, Saxton.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Inc., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations, : 27 cm
Summary:
Brief text and photographs of carvings made from vegetables introduce the world of emotions by presenting leading questions such as "Are you feeling angry?"
Language:
English
Reading Level:
BR Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC K-2 1.3 1 Quiz: 21177 Guided reading level: NR.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780439104319

9781417643189

9780439598415
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"Who'd have dreamed that produce could be so expressive, so charming, so lively and funny'...Freymann and...Elffers have created sweet and feisty little beings with feelings, passions, fears and an emotional range that is, well, organic." - The New York Times Book Review. "Use this book to discuss different moods, to introduce the names of many fruits and vegetables, to identify colors, and to inspire young artists to create sculptures of their own." - School Library Journal, starred review


Author Notes

Joost Elffers is the producer of Viking Studio's bestselling The Secret Language of Birthdays, The Secret Language of Relationships, and Play with Your Food.

He lives in New York City.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-6. Devious oranges, shy radishes, a socially outcast leek? All roll across the colorful pages of this novelty book. With expertly cut mouths and seed eyes, a variety of produce shows a roller coaster of emotional states--happiness, shyness, love, jealousy, embarrassment--as rhyming text asks children about feelings: "When you're angry, do you pout? Whine? Cry? Scream? Shout?" Kids will find the inherent silliness irresistible and be drawn in by the book's visual appeal: the colors are strong, the photography is excellent, and the expressions, derived from the natural lumps and bumps of the fruits and vegetables (enhanced by a few incisions), are surprisingly masterful. Adults may use this as a starting point for discussing feelings with the very young. But most likely, kids will flip through the pages for quick, easy laughs. --Gillian Engberg


Publisher's Weekly Review

Photos of scowling oranges and gregarious scallions garnish this garden of delights from the creators of Play with Your Food. The recipe is simple and successful. Freymann and Elffers find a piece of "expressive produce" and attach two black-eyed peas for eyes. Without further ado, the veggie becomes a face, with a knobby stem or skinny root for a schnozzola; an upended mushroom has a hilarious piglike snout, while a kiwi fruit has a button nose. The animated groceries are exhibited, actual size or larger, against crisp hues of harvest gold, melon green or late-night-sky blue. Their groupings imply close relationships: lemons trade meaningful glances and a little onion cries. Meanwhile, the rhyming text draws comparisons between the emotive plants and its audience when it queries, "Wired? Tired? Need a kiss?/ Do you know anyone like this?" The plotless and largely superfluous narrative recommends expressing jealousy or affection ("When how you feel is understood,/ you have a friend, and that feels good"). It's a sentiment as healthy as an apple a day, but the book's real charm is derived from the almost-ready-made "sculptures"Äas an afterword calls them. This wish-I'd-thought-of-that compendium provides an excellent impetus for a craft session: the ingredients are cheap, and mistakes can be eaten as salad (if artists have the heart). All ages. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-An eye-catching and enormously appealing book. Freymann and Elffers frequented New York's fruit and vegetable markets, picking out particularly "expressive" onions, peppers, oranges, apples, and the like. They then created intriguing faces on the produce, taking advantage of stems and creases, carving mouths, and adding black-eyed peas for eyes. The sculptures were then photographed on solid-colored backgrounds. The "faces" clearly show an array of emotions, from excitement and happiness to frustration and confusion. Accompanied by simple rhymes ("When you have to wait, because someone is late,/are you bored? Jumpy? Worried? Grumpy?/Excited as the minutes pass?/Now your friend is here at last!"), the attractive photographs burst with color. Use this book to discuss different moods, to introduce the names of many fruits and vegetables, to identify colors, and to inspire young artists to create sculptures of their own.-Anne Knickerbocker, Cedar Brook Elementary School, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.