Cover image for Mr. Peters' connections
Title:
Mr. Peters' connections
Author:
Miller, Arthur, 1915-2005.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Penguin Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
viii, 56 pages ; 20 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780140285956

9780140482454
Format :
Book

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PS3525.I5156 M7 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Produced in May 1998 in New York and starring Peter Falk, Mr. Peters' Connections takes place, in Miller's own words, in "that suspended state of consciousness when the mind is freed to roam from real memories to conjectures, from trivialities to tragic insights, from terror of death to glorying in one's being alive." Within the confines of his mind, Mr. Peters interacts with the living members of his family and his long-deceased brother and lover, as well as the imaginary Adele, a black bag lady, who is a figment of Peters' imagination and one of Miller's most original characters. "A work of rare honesty and dignity" (Fintan O'Toole, New York Daily News), Mr. Peters' Connections uncoils with ferocious, life-affirming intensity.

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Summary

Produced in May 1998 in New York and starring Peter Falk, Mr. Peters' Connections takes place, in Miller's own words, in "that suspended state of consciousness when the mind is freed to roam from real memories to conjectures, from trivialities to tragic insights, from terror of death to glorying in one's being alive." Within the confines of his mind, Mr. Peters interacts with the living members of his family and his long-deceased brother and lover, as well as the imaginary Adele, a black bag lady, who is a figment of Peters' imagination and one of Miller's most original characters. "A work of rare honesty and dignity" ( Fintan O'Toole, New York Daily News ), Mr. Peters' Connections uncoils with ferocious, life-affirming intensity.


Author Notes

The son of a well-to-do New York Jewish family, Miller graduated from high school and then went to work in a warehouse. He was born on October 17, 1915, in Harlem, New York City. His plays have been called "political," but he considers the areas of literature and politics to be quite separate and has said, "The only sure and valid aim---speaking of art as a weapon---is the humanizing of man." The recurring theme of all his plays is the relationship between a man's identity and the image that society demands of him. After two years, he entered the University of Michigan, where he soon started writing plays.

All My Sons (1947), a Broadway success that won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1947, tells the story of a son, home from the war, who learns that his brother's death was due to defective airplane parts turned out by their profiteering father. Death of a Salesman (1949), Miller's experimental yet classical American tragedy, received both the Pulitzer Prize and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1949. It is a poignant statement of a man facing himself and his failure. In The Crucible (1953), a play about bigotry in the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692, Miller brings into focus the social tragedy of a society gone mad, as well as the agony of a heroic individual. The play was generally considered to be a comment on the McCarthyism of its time. Miller himself appeared before the Congressional Un-American Activities Committee and steadfastly refused to involve his friends and associates when questioned about them.

His screenplay for The Misfits (1961), from his short story, was written for his second wife, actress Marilyn Monroe (see Vol. 3); After the Fall (1964) has clear autobiographical overtones and involves the story of this ill-fated marriage as well as further dealing with Miller's experiences with McCarthyism. In the one-act Incident at Vichy (1964), a group of men are picked off the streets one morning during the Nazi occupation of France. The Price (1968) is a psychological drama concerning two brothers, one a police officer, one a wealthy surgeon, whose long-standing conflict is explored over the disposal of their father's furniture. The Creation of the World and Other Business (1973) is a retelling of the story of Genesis, attempted as a comedy. The American Clock (1980) explores the impact of the Depression on the nation and its individual citizens.

Among Miller's most recent works is Danger: Memory! (1987), a study of two elderly friends. During the 1980s, almost all of Miller's plays were given major British revivals, and the playwright's work has been more popular in Britain than in the United States of late.

Miller died of heart failure after a battle against cancer, pneumonia and congestive heart disease at his home in Roxbury, Connecticut. He was 89 years old. (Bowker Author Biography) Arthur Miller, American playwright, was born on October 17, 1915, in New York City. He earned an AB from the University of Michigan and began to write plays while still a student. He won the first of his many awards, the Avery Hopwood Prize of the University of Michigan, for his first play, Honors at Dawn. This was followed by many other award-winning plays. One of the best-known of these, Death of a Salesman, won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1949 as well as a Drama Critics Circle Award; it continues to be one of the most frequently performed and adapted plays of this century. Some of his other titles include The Crucible, A View From the Bridge, The Misfits, After the Fall, and Vichy. Miller also wrote several travel pieces, including In Russia and Chinese Encounters (both in collaboration with his third wife, Ingeborg Morath); a novel, Focus; and the autobiography, Timebends: A Life.

Arthur Miller was married to Mary Grace Slattery in 1940. They had two children and were divorced in 1952. In 1956, he married actress Marilyn Monroe and they divorced in 1961. He married Morath in 1962 and they have two children together.

(Bowker Author Biography)


The son of a well-to-do New York Jewish family, Miller graduated from high school and then went to work in a warehouse. He was born on October 17, 1915, in Harlem, New York City. His plays have been called "political," but he considers the areas of literature and politics to be quite separate and has said, "The only sure and valid aim---speaking of art as a weapon---is the humanizing of man." The recurring theme of all his plays is the relationship between a man's identity and the image that society demands of him. After two years, he entered the University of Michigan, where he soon started writing plays.

All My Sons (1947), a Broadway success that won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1947, tells the story of a son, home from the war, who learns that his brother's death was due to defective airplane parts turned out by their profiteering father. Death of a Salesman (1949), Miller's experimental yet classical American tragedy, received both the Pulitzer Prize and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1949. It is a poignant statement of a man facing himself and his failure. In The Crucible (1953), a play about bigotry in the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692, Miller brings into focus the social tragedy of a society gone mad, as well as the agony of a heroic individual. The play was generally considered to be a comment on the McCarthyism of its time. Miller himself appeared before the Congressional Un-American Activities Committee and steadfastly refused to involve his friends and associates when questioned about them.

His screenplay for The Misfits (1961), from his short story, was written for his second wife, actress Marilyn Monroe (see Vol. 3); After the Fall (1964) has clear autobiographical overtones and involves the story of this ill-fated marriage as well as further dealing with Miller's experiences with McCarthyism. In the one-act Incident at Vichy (1964), a group of men are picked off the streets one morning during the Nazi occupation of France. The Price (1968) is a psychological drama concerning two brothers, one a police officer, one a wealthy surgeon, whose long-standing conflict is explored over the disposal of their father's furniture. The Creation of the World and Other Business (1973) is a retelling of the story of Genesis, attempted as a comedy. The American Clock (1980) explores the impact of the Depression on the nation and its individual citizens.

Among Miller's most recent works is Danger: Memory! (1987), a study of two elderly friends. During the 1980s, almost all of Miller's plays were given major British revivals, and the playwright's work has been more popular in Britain than in the United States of late.

Miller died of heart failure after a battle against cancer, pneumonia and congestive heart disease at his home in Roxbury, Connecticut. He was 89 years old. (Bowker Author Biography) Arthur Miller, American playwright, was born on October 17, 1915, in New York City. He earned an AB from the University of Michigan and began to write plays while still a student. He won the first of his many awards, the Avery Hopwood Prize of the University of Michigan, for his first play, Honors at Dawn. This was followed by many other award-winning plays. One of the best-known of these, Death of a Salesman, won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1949 as well as a Drama Critics Circle Award; it continues to be one of the most frequently performed and adapted plays of this century. Some of his other titles include The Crucible, A View From the Bridge, The Misfits, After the Fall, and Vichy. Miller also wrote several travel pieces, including In Russia and Chinese Encounters (both in collaboration with his third wife, Ingeborg Morath); a novel, Focus; and the autobiography, Timebends: A Life.

Arthur Miller was married to Mary Grace Slattery in 1940. They had two children and were divorced in 1952. In 1956, he married actress Marilyn Monroe and they divorced in 1961. He married Morath in 1962 and they have two children together.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Often called a naturalist, Miller yet writes plays that are as much about dreams and people lost in them as about reality. Half of Willy Loman's tragedy in Death of a Salesman is that he hasn't lived in the real world in decades. Even The Crucible, while grounded in the historic colonial Massachusetts, focuses on mass hallucination. Rarely, however, does Miller allow the dream world to invade a play as completely as in this extended one-act set entirely in the mind of snoozing Mr. Peters. It develops like some fevered dream, with long-dead relatives popping in for short visits and people making the most extravagant demands. Sections of it seem like outtakes from earlier Miller plays, especially--in a sequence featuring the protagonist's Marilyn Monroe^-like significant other, who ignites the libido of every man she meets--After the Fall. More often, it seems more like something from Edward Albee's zoo, which is no bad thing. It is fascinating to see America's greatest living playwright at work in a totally surreal world. --Jack Helbig


Library Journal Review

At the age of 84, 50 years after he received the Pulitzer Prize for Death of a Salesman, Miller remains the premiere living American dramatist and one of the three or four greatest of this century. This play, which debuted Off Broadway last year with Peter Falk in the title role, is Miller's strongest play in 30 years. Effectively using absurdist techniques, Miller places Mr. Peters, a retired pilot, in an abandoned bar, where he encounters his deceased brother, an ex-lover and the man he imagines she might have married had she lived, his daughter and her boyfriend, his wife, and a bag lady who, like most of the other characters, may be a figment of Peters's imagination. With all of them, he seeks connection and, if possible, an answer to the question, "What is the subject?"Äor, indeed, whether we even need a subject any longer. These existential questions are old ones; Miller gives them stunning dramatic shape and force. Essential for all American literature collections.ÄRobert W. Melton, Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Often called a naturalist, Miller yet writes plays that are as much about dreams and people lost in them as about reality. Half of Willy Loman's tragedy in Death of a Salesman is that he hasn't lived in the real world in decades. Even The Crucible, while grounded in the historic colonial Massachusetts, focuses on mass hallucination. Rarely, however, does Miller allow the dream world to invade a play as completely as in this extended one-act set entirely in the mind of snoozing Mr. Peters. It develops like some fevered dream, with long-dead relatives popping in for short visits and people making the most extravagant demands. Sections of it seem like outtakes from earlier Miller plays, especially--in a sequence featuring the protagonist's Marilyn Monroe^-like significant other, who ignites the libido of every man she meets--After the Fall. More often, it seems more like something from Edward Albee's zoo, which is no bad thing. It is fascinating to see America's greatest living playwright at work in a totally surreal world. --Jack Helbig


Library Journal Review

At the age of 84, 50 years after he received the Pulitzer Prize for Death of a Salesman, Miller remains the premiere living American dramatist and one of the three or four greatest of this century. This play, which debuted Off Broadway last year with Peter Falk in the title role, is Miller's strongest play in 30 years. Effectively using absurdist techniques, Miller places Mr. Peters, a retired pilot, in an abandoned bar, where he encounters his deceased brother, an ex-lover and the man he imagines she might have married had she lived, his daughter and her boyfriend, his wife, and a bag lady who, like most of the other characters, may be a figment of Peters's imagination. With all of them, he seeks connection and, if possible, an answer to the question, "What is the subject?"Äor, indeed, whether we even need a subject any longer. These existential questions are old ones; Miller gives them stunning dramatic shape and force. Essential for all American literature collections.ÄRobert W. Melton, Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.