Cover image for A field guide to medicinal plants and herbs of eastern and central North America
Title:
A field guide to medicinal plants and herbs of eastern and central North America
Author:
Foster, Steven, 1957-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000.
Physical Description:
xiii, 411 pages : color illustrations ; 20 cm.
General Note:
"Sponsored by the National Audubon Society, the National Wildlife Federation, and the Roger Tory Peterson Institute."

Rev. ed. of: Field guide to medicinal plants. 1990.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780395988152

9780395988145
Format :
Book

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QK99.U6 F68 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Reference
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Summary

Summary

At a time when interest in herbs and natural medicine has never been higher, the second edition of this essential guide shows how to identify more than five hundred kinds of healing plants. More than three hundred new color photos illustrate their flowers, leaves, and fruits. The updated descriptive text includes information on where the plants are found as well as their known medicinal uses. An index to medical topics is helpful for quickly locating information on specific ailments, from asthma and headaches to colds and stomachaches. Symbols next to plant descriptions give readers a quick visual alert to plants that are poisonous or may cause allergic reactions. Organized by plant color for fast identification, this guide is an indispensable tool for understanding the traditional medicinal uses of the plants and herbs around us.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

In this new edition of Foster's Field Guide to Medicinal Plants (1990), Foster and Duke, both writers, make available information and understanding of 500 medicinal plants growing in the eastern US as natives or introductions. The book is divided into wild flowers (herbs), shrubs, trees, and woody vines. The wild flowers are divided into sections based on flower color; a plant having a range of color may be found in more than one section. The shrubs, trees, and woody vines are separated primarily on leaf characters. Most of the plants are illustrated with color photographs, and included for each plant are one or two common names, the scientific name, the common name of the plant family, a notation of the part of the plant used, a brief description, where the plant is found, and warnings regarding its use. This book is designed to be used by the lay public, though this reviewer has certain reservations. If the identification is to be based on pictures, several were found where the photograph is so small and dark that it is difficult to see the plant. Readers should be cautious. General readers. C. T. Mason Jr. emeritus, University of Arizona


Excerpts

Excerpts

BALSAM FIR Resin, leaves Abies balsamea (L.) Mill Pine FamilySpire-shaped tree; to 60 ft. Flattish needles, to 11?4 in. long, in flattened sprays; stalkless. Needles rounded at base, each with 2 white lines beneath. Cones 14 in. long, erect; purple to green, scales mostly twice as long as broad. Bark smooth, with numerous resin pockets. Where found: Moist woods. Canada, south through New England and along mountains to Va. and W. Va.; west through n. Ohio to ne. Iowa, Mich. Uses: Canada Balsam, an oleoresin, is collected by cutting bark blisters or pockets in wood, JulyAug. Used as an antiseptic, in creams and ointments for piles, and as a root-canal sealer. Diuretic (may irritate mucous membranes). American Indians applied resin as an analgesic for burns, sores, bruises, and wounds. Leaf tea used for colds, coughs, and asthma. The oleoresin is pale yellow to greenish yellow; transparent and pleasantly scented. Its primary commercial application has been as a sealing agent for mounted microscope slides. Warning: Resin may cause dermatitis in some individuals. Excerpted from A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs: Of Eastern and Central North America by Steven Foster, James A. Duke All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. v
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
How to Use This Bookp. 1
General Organizationp. 1
Identifying Plantsp. 2
Medicinal Usesp. 5
Conservation and Harvestingp. 7
A Word of Cautionp. 10
White or Whitish Flowersp. 15
Yellow Flowersp. 99
Orange Flowersp. 151
Pink to Red Flowersp. 155
Violet to Blue Flowersp. 189
Green Flowersp. 228
Shrubsp. 254
Treesp. 289
Woody Vinesp. 333
Fernsp. 342
Grasses and Grasslike Plantsp. 350
Glossaryp. 357
Referencesp. 362
Life Listp. 365
Index to Plantsp. 377
Index to Medical Topicsp. 396