Cover image for Wildlife wars : the life and times of a fish and game warden
Title:
Wildlife wars : the life and times of a fish and game warden
Author:
Grosz, Terry.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boulder, Colo. : Johnson Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xv, 288 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9781555662455

9781555662462
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library SK354.G76 A3 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Environmentalism meets Indiana Jones in these rip-snorting tales of a former wildlife conservation officer. The bad guys here are illegal deer hunters, law-breaking drag-boat fishermen who pilfer the ocean depths, poachers who kill elk, anglers who disrupt historic salmon spawning grounds and other miscreants who feed the flourishing illicit wildlife trade. Grosz has seen them all -- and arrested many -- in his 32 years as a special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and as a California state fish and game warden. A bear of a man -- six-foot-four, over 300 pounds -- Grosz relates his exploits in adventures full of slam-bang action and bravado tempered by a coolheaded sense of humor. Motivated by reverence for God's creation, he comes off as a mixture of guts and heart. In one episode, he sleeps overnight in a California rice field with a feeding flock of several thousand mallard ducks to protect them from commercial hunters. Full of gumption and guile, Grosz readily admits to failings that render him more likably human. He gets seasick and retches while making on-board boat inspections, and in one bust gone bad, a duck hunter sprays his backside with 189 shotgun pellets. Overall, these offbeat tales effectively dramatize the underfunded, underappreciated, dangerous and heroic activities of wildlife agents. (Oct.)


Summary

Wildlife Wars serves up tales from Terry Grosz's early years as a game warden in the field for the State of California, where he matched wits with elk poachers, salmon snaggers, duck harvesters, and a host of other law-breakers.


Author Notes

Terry Grosz was a conservation officer for California and then the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for more than 30 years. He lives in Colorado.


Terry Grosz was a conservation officer for California and then the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for more than 30 years. He lives in Colorado.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

The author of these memoirs worked for the California Department of Fish and Game from 1966 to 1970 and for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from 1970 to 1998. He fought a war against the greed of the market hunters, who traded in animals and animal parts, and the egos of the trophy hunters, who consider themselves above the law. His collection of tales needs to be told, for it helps combat an enormous problem concerning our country's natural wildlife. Grosz is obviously a very committed individual--and also a natural storyteller. This collection consists of stories about his early years as a warden in California. They relate many close calls with mother nature: wild creatures and savage lawbreakers. The fact that the prosecution of environmental crimes has dropped precipitously in recent years indicates a need for a wake-up call such as this. Those who cherish the outdoors for hunting and fishing as well as those involved in environmental studies will benefit from this work. --Fred Egloff


Publisher's Weekly Review

Environmentalism meets Indiana Jones in these rip-snorting tales of a former wildlife conservation officer. The bad guys here are illegal deer hunters, law-breaking drag-boat fishermen who pilfer the ocean depths, poachers who kill elk, anglers who disrupt historic salmon spawning grounds and other miscreants who feed the flourishing illicit wildlife trade. Grosz has seen them allÄand arrested manyÄin his 32 years as a special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and as a California state fish and game warden. A bear of a manÄsix-foot-four, over 300 poundsÄGrosz relates his exploits in adventures full of slam-bang action and bravado tempered by a coolheaded sense of humor. Motivated by reverence for God's creation, he comes off as a mixture of guts and heart. In one episode, he sleeps overnight in a California rice field with a feeding flock of several thousand mallard ducks to protect them from commercial hunters. Full of gumption and guile, Grosz readily admits to failings that render him more likably human. He gets seasick and retches while making on-board boat inspections, and in one bust gone bad, a duck hunter sprays his backside with 189 shotgun pellets. Overall, these offbeat tales effectively dramatize the underfunded, underappreciated, dangerous and heroic activities of wildlife agents. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

The author of these memoirs worked for the California Department of Fish and Game from 1966 to 1970 and for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from 1970 to 1998. He fought a war against the greed of the market hunters, who traded in animals and animal parts, and the egos of the trophy hunters, who consider themselves above the law. His collection of tales needs to be told, for it helps combat an enormous problem concerning our country's natural wildlife. Grosz is obviously a very committed individual--and also a natural storyteller. This collection consists of stories about his early years as a warden in California. They relate many close calls with mother nature: wild creatures and savage lawbreakers. The fact that the prosecution of environmental crimes has dropped precipitously in recent years indicates a need for a wake-up call such as this. Those who cherish the outdoors for hunting and fishing as well as those involved in environmental studies will benefit from this work. --Fred Egloff


Publisher's Weekly Review

Environmentalism meets Indiana Jones in these rip-snorting tales of a former wildlife conservation officer. The bad guys here are illegal deer hunters, law-breaking drag-boat fishermen who pilfer the ocean depths, poachers who kill elk, anglers who disrupt historic salmon spawning grounds and other miscreants who feed the flourishing illicit wildlife trade. Grosz has seen them allÄand arrested manyÄin his 32 years as a special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and as a California state fish and game warden. A bear of a manÄsix-foot-four, over 300 poundsÄGrosz relates his exploits in adventures full of slam-bang action and bravado tempered by a coolheaded sense of humor. Motivated by reverence for God's creation, he comes off as a mixture of guts and heart. In one episode, he sleeps overnight in a California rice field with a feeding flock of several thousand mallard ducks to protect them from commercial hunters. Full of gumption and guile, Grosz readily admits to failings that render him more likably human. He gets seasick and retches while making on-board boat inspections, and in one bust gone bad, a duck hunter sprays his backside with 189 shotgun pellets. Overall, these offbeat tales effectively dramatize the underfunded, underappreciated, dangerous and heroic activities of wildlife agents. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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