Cover image for Prisons
Title:
Prisons
Author:
Grapes, Bryan J.
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Greenhaven Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
176 pages ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780737701470

9780737701463
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The prison population in the United States has grown dramatically. With this growth comes controversy over the condition and effectiveness of prisons. Tentative chapters in this anthology include: Do Prisons Work? How Should Prisoners Be Treated? Is The Use of Inmate Labor Acceptable? What are the Alternatives to Prison?


Summary

The prison population in the United States has grown dramatically. With this growth comes controversy over the condition and effectiveness of prisons. Tentative chapters in this anthology include: Do Prisons Work? How Should Prisoners Be Treated? Is The Use of Inmate Labor Acceptable? What are the Alternatives to Prison?


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 8^-12. Like others in the Current Controversies series, this anthology presents opposing sides of a controversial topic. It examines in depth four questions concerning the effectiveness of incarceration, the treatment of prisoners, privatization, and inmate labor. Arguments for and against each question are given, culled from a variety of publications and representing a wide range of views, with contributors' affiliations and backgrounds briefly noted. The articles are current: many are dated 1999; the oldest appeared in 1994. An extensive bibliography and a list of pertinent organizations, including Web sites, will facilitate further research. While there is some topical overlap with the Opposing Viewpoints 1991 series title America's Prisons, there is no duplication of articles, and the focus and format are different. Teens studying the controversial issues surrounding America's penal system will appreciate the thoroughness and unbiased approach. --Catherine Andronik


Booklist Review

Gr. 8^-12. Like others in the Current Controversies series, this anthology presents opposing sides of a controversial topic. It examines in depth four questions concerning the effectiveness of incarceration, the treatment of prisoners, privatization, and inmate labor. Arguments for and against each question are given, culled from a variety of publications and representing a wide range of views, with contributors' affiliations and backgrounds briefly noted. The articles are current: many are dated 1999; the oldest appeared in 1994. An extensive bibliography and a list of pertinent organizations, including Web sites, will facilitate further research. While there is some topical overlap with the Opposing Viewpoints 1991 series title America's Prisons, there is no duplication of articles, and the focus and format are different. Teens studying the controversial issues surrounding America's penal system will appreciate the thoroughness and unbiased approach. --Catherine Andronik


Table of Contents

Andrew Peyton ThomasMorgan ReynoldsSteve H. Hanke and Howard BaetjerDan LungrenWilliam H. RentschlerSasha AbramskyDavid C. AndersonDana TofigRowland NethawayJoseph A. Califano Jr.Elizabeth J. SwaseyJohn P. ZerilloJon Marc TaylorAndy MagerCharles H. LoganWayne CalabreseAbigail McCarthyC. Stone BrownVince BeiserEric BatesTimothy BurnMorgan ReynoldsChristianity TodayMichael N. HarrellCharlie CristJane SlaughterAnn HoffmanJohn L. ZaluskyChristine Long-WagnerAndrew Peyton ThomasMorgan ReynoldsSteve H. Hanke and Howard BaetjerDan LungrenWilliam H. RentschlerSasha AbramskyDavid C. AndersonDana TofigRowland NethawayJoseph A. Califano Jr.Elizabeth J. SwaseyJohn P. ZerilloJon Marc TaylorAndy MagerCharles H. LoganWayne CalabreseAbigail McCarthyC. Stone BrownVince BeiserEric BatesTimothy BurnMorgan ReynoldsChristianity TodayMichael N. HarrellCharlie CristJane SlaughterAnn HoffmanJohn L. ZaluskyChristine Long-Wagner
Forewordp. 11
Introductionp. 13
Chapter 1 Are Prisons Effective?
Chapter Prefacep. 17
Yes: Prisons Are an Effective Solution to Crime
The Prison System Worksp. 18
Imprisonment Is an Effective Deterrent to Crimep. 21
Incarceration Reduces Crimep. 26
Increased Incarceration of Criminals Benefits Societyp. 32
No: Prisons Are Not an Effective Solution to Crime
The Prison System Does Not Workp. 40
Incarceration Exacerbates Criminal Behaviorp. 45
Alternatives to Incarceration Would Benefit Societyp. 52
Chapter 2 How Should Prisons Treat Inmates?
The Treatment of Inmates: An Overviewp. 64
Prisons Should Punish Inmatesp. 70
Prisons Should Rehabilitate Inmatesp. 72
Inmates Should Not Be Coddledp. 78
Prisoners Should Not Have Access to Weight Training Facilitiesp. 81
Weight Training Is a Valuable Rehabilitative Toolp. 84
Violent Inmates Should Not Be Placed in Super-Max Prisonsp. 88
Chapter 3 Should Prisons Be Privatized?
Chapter Prefacep. 95
Yes: The Prison System Would Benefit from Privatization
Privatization Would Improve the Prison Systemp. 96
Private Prisons Are Cost Effectivep. 104
Private Prisons Provide More Incentive for Rehabilitationp. 110
No: The Prison System Would Not Benefit from Privatization
Providing Financial Incentives for Incarceration Is Unethicalp. 113
Private Prisons Foster Corruptionp. 118
Private Prisons Are Abusive and Inefficientp. 122
Chapter 4 Should Prisons Use Inmate Labor?
Prison Labor: An Overviewp. 128
Yes: Prisons Should Use Inmate Labor
Prison Labor Is Beneficialp. 133
Prison Labor Is Essential to Rehabilitationp. 137
Prison Laborers Learn Marketable Skillsp. 140
Inmate Chain Gangs Are an Effective Deterrent to Crimep. 144
No: Prisons Should Not Use Inmate Labor
Prison Labor Is Not Beneficialp. 146
Prison Labor Threatens the Jobs of Law-Abiding Citizensp. 152
Prison Labor Is Slave Laborp. 156
Prison Labor May Pose a Threat to Public Safetyp. 160
Bibliographyp. 164
Organizations to Contactp. 166
Indexp. 170
Forewordp. 11
Introductionp. 13
Chapter 1 Are Prisons Effective?
Chapter Prefacep. 17
Yes: Prisons Are an Effective Solution to Crime
The Prison System Worksp. 18
Imprisonment Is an Effective Deterrent to Crimep. 21
Incarceration Reduces Crimep. 26
Increased Incarceration of Criminals Benefits Societyp. 32
No: Prisons Are Not an Effective Solution to Crime
The Prison System Does Not Workp. 40
Incarceration Exacerbates Criminal Behaviorp. 45
Alternatives to Incarceration Would Benefit Societyp. 52
Chapter 2 How Should Prisons Treat Inmates?
The Treatment of Inmates: An Overviewp. 64
Prisons Should Punish Inmatesp. 70
Prisons Should Rehabilitate Inmatesp. 72
Inmates Should Not Be Coddledp. 78
Prisoners Should Not Have Access to Weight Training Facilitiesp. 81
Weight Training Is a Valuable Rehabilitative Toolp. 84
Violent Inmates Should Not Be Placed in Super-Max Prisonsp. 88
Chapter 3 Should Prisons Be Privatized?
Chapter Prefacep. 95
Yes: The Prison System Would Benefit from Privatization
Privatization Would Improve the Prison Systemp. 96
Private Prisons Are Cost Effectivep. 104
Private Prisons Provide More Incentive for Rehabilitationp. 110
No: The Prison System Would Not Benefit from Privatization
Providing Financial Incentives for Incarceration Is Unethicalp. 113
Private Prisons Foster Corruptionp. 118
Private Prisons Are Abusive and Inefficientp. 122
Chapter 4 Should Prisons Use Inmate Labor?
Prison Labor: An Overviewp. 128
Yes: Prisons Should Use Inmate Labor
Prison Labor Is Beneficialp. 133
Prison Labor Is Essential to Rehabilitationp. 137
Prison Laborers Learn Marketable Skillsp. 140
Inmate Chain Gangs Are an Effective Deterrent to Crimep. 144
No: Prisons Should Not Use Inmate Labor
Prison Labor Is Not Beneficialp. 146
Prison Labor Threatens the Jobs of Law-Abiding Citizensp. 152
Prison Labor Is Slave Laborp. 156
Prison Labor May Pose a Threat to Public Safetyp. 160
Bibliographyp. 164
Organizations to Contactp. 166
Indexp. 170