Cover image for North American Indian wars
Title:
North American Indian wars
Author:
Nardo, Don, 1947-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
221 pages ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781565109599

9781565109582
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
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Eden Library E81 .N69 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library E81 .N69 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library E81 .N69 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This book covers the major themes and conflicts of the wars that ended in the defeat and devastation of America's Native American population. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Summary

This book covers the major themes and conflicts of the wars that ended in the defeat and devastation of America's Native American population. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. The latest anthology of essays in the Turning Points in World History series provides an excellent overview of the conflicts between the American Indians and the U.S. The book begins with a look at the cultural differences that led to misconceptions and hostilities. Major clashes, including the Black Hawk War and the Wounded Knee Massacre, are analyzed for their immediate as well as their long-range effects. The disastrous impact of Indian removal and relocation programs, the wholesale slaughter of the buffalo, and efforts to convert Indians to Christianity are among the topics clearly identified. An examination of the ongoing issue of assimilation versus self-determination concludes. The clear, concise essays, written by noted scholars and historians, offer a fine opportunity for understanding the complex issues often overlooked when studying the history of the U.S. and the American Indians. Students interested in further research will appreciate the excerpts from primary source documents and the extensive bibliography. --Karen Hutt


Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-This anthology of 17 compelling essays describes the devastating impact of western expansion on the Native American civilizations. Before the Europeans came to North America there were "...at least 1 million Indians, organized into some six hundred separate, flourishing tribes." By the end of the Indian Wars in the 1890s, the native population was less than 400,000. These accessible 5-to-14 page articles are introduced with a concise summary outlining the essay's main points and giving some background on the event, policy, or belief, as well as information about the author. The selections focus on the differences between the Native and white cultures, significant confrontations, and the impact and legacy of the wars. Excerpts from primary sources; an extensive, topically arranged list for further reading; a four-page chronology; and a comprehensive index add to the value of this resource. Useful as report and debate material, and for those interested in Native American history.-Sandra L. Doggett, Urbana High School, Ijamsville, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. The latest anthology of essays in the Turning Points in World History series provides an excellent overview of the conflicts between the American Indians and the U.S. The book begins with a look at the cultural differences that led to misconceptions and hostilities. Major clashes, including the Black Hawk War and the Wounded Knee Massacre, are analyzed for their immediate as well as their long-range effects. The disastrous impact of Indian removal and relocation programs, the wholesale slaughter of the buffalo, and efforts to convert Indians to Christianity are among the topics clearly identified. An examination of the ongoing issue of assimilation versus self-determination concludes. The clear, concise essays, written by noted scholars and historians, offer a fine opportunity for understanding the complex issues often overlooked when studying the history of the U.S. and the American Indians. Students interested in further research will appreciate the excerpts from primary source documents and the extensive bibliography. --Karen Hutt


Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-This anthology of 17 compelling essays describes the devastating impact of western expansion on the Native American civilizations. Before the Europeans came to North America there were "...at least 1 million Indians, organized into some six hundred separate, flourishing tribes." By the end of the Indian Wars in the 1890s, the native population was less than 400,000. These accessible 5-to-14 page articles are introduced with a concise summary outlining the essay's main points and giving some background on the event, policy, or belief, as well as information about the author. The selections focus on the differences between the Native and white cultures, significant confrontations, and the impact and legacy of the wars. Excerpts from primary sources; an extensive, topically arranged list for further reading; a four-page chronology; and a comprehensive index add to the value of this resource. Useful as report and debate material, and for those interested in Native American history.-Sandra L. Doggett, Urbana High School, Ijamsville, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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