Cover image for The hundred dresses
Title:
The hundred dresses
Author:
Estes, Eleanor, 1906-1988.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972.

©1944
Physical Description:
80 pages : illustrations (part color) ; 22 cm
Summary:
In winning a medal she is no longer there to receive, a tight-lipped little Polish girl teaches her classmates a lesson.
General Note:
"A Voyager book."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
870 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.4 1.0 42.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.5 3 Quiz: 05491 Guided reading level: O.
ISBN:
9780156423502

9780152373740
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Eleanor Estes's The Hundred Dresses won a Newbery Honor in 1945 and has never been out of print since. At the heart of the story is Wanda Petronski, a Polish girl in a Connecticut school who is ridiculed by her classmates for wearing the same faded blue dress every day. Wanda claims she has one hundred dresses at home, but everyone knows she doesn't and bullies her mercilessly. The class feels terrible when Wanda is pulled out of the school, but by that time it's too late for apologies. Maddie, one of Wanda's classmates, ultimately decides that she is "never going to stand by and say nothing again."


Summary

Eleanor Estes's The Hundred Dresses won a Newbery Honor in 1945 and has never been out of print since. At the heart of the story is Wanda Petronski, a Polish girl in a Connecticut school who is ridiculed by her classmates for wearing the same faded blue dress every day. Wanda claims she has one hundred dresses at home, but everyone knows she doesn't and bullies her mercilessly. The class feels terrible when Wanda is pulled out of the school, but by that time it's too late for apologies. Maddie, one of Wanda's classmates, ultimately decides that she is "never going to stand by and say nothing again."


Author Notes

Eleanor Estes was born in West Haven, Connecticut on May 9, 1906. She graduated from the Pratt Institute Library School and worked as a children's librarian in branches of the New York Public Library system. Her first book, The Moffats, was published in 1941. Her other works include The Hundred Dresses and Ginger Pye, which won a John Newbery Medal for the most distinguished children's book in 1952. She also wrote a single adult novel entitled The Echoing Green. She died of complications following a stroke on July 15, 1988 at the age of 82.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Eleanor Estes was born in West Haven, Connecticut on May 9, 1906. She graduated from the Pratt Institute Library School and worked as a children's librarian in branches of the New York Public Library system. Her first book, The Moffats, was published in 1941. Her other works include The Hundred Dresses and Ginger Pye, which won a John Newbery Medal for the most distinguished children's book in 1952. She also wrote a single adult novel entitled The Echoing Green. She died of complications following a stroke on July 15, 1988 at the age of 82.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Classic titles return in time for the gift-giving season. For a new generation of readers, Eleanor Estes's long-treasured title, The Hundred Dresses (1944), illus. by Louis Slobodkin, appears in its 60th anniversary finery with newly "restored color" in the artwork. Wanda faces mockery at school, both because of her "funny" last name (Petron-ski) and her claims that she has 100 dresses at home even though she wears the same one to school each day. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Friendship, peer pressure, regret, and courage are all issues that are integral to this Newbery Honor book by Eleanor Estes (Harcourt, 1944). Wanda Petronski tells classmates she has a hundred dresses of all varieties in her closet at home. So why does she always wear the same old worn dress to school? The teasing that follows seems harmless, but it's not. This book explores the hurt that comes from thoughtless words, and offers a painful, but heart-warming lesson in forgiveness. Christina Moore reads the unabridged story with warmth and expression. The author's carefully chosen words stand on their own without the distraction of sound effects or music. This is a well-done production of an exceptional book that has earned its place as a childhood classic.-Teresa Bateman, Brigadoon Elementary School, Federal Way, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Classic titles return in time for the gift-giving season. For a new generation of readers, Eleanor Estes's long-treasured title, The Hundred Dresses (1944), illus. by Louis Slobodkin, appears in its 60th anniversary finery with newly "restored color" in the artwork. Wanda faces mockery at school, both because of her "funny" last name (Petron-ski) and her claims that she has 100 dresses at home even though she wears the same one to school each day. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Friendship, peer pressure, regret, and courage are all issues that are integral to this Newbery Honor book by Eleanor Estes (Harcourt, 1944). Wanda Petronski tells classmates she has a hundred dresses of all varieties in her closet at home. So why does she always wear the same old worn dress to school? The teasing that follows seems harmless, but it's not. This book explores the hurt that comes from thoughtless words, and offers a painful, but heart-warming lesson in forgiveness. Christina Moore reads the unabridged story with warmth and expression. The author's carefully chosen words stand on their own without the distraction of sound effects or music. This is a well-done production of an exceptional book that has earned its place as a childhood classic.-Teresa Bateman, Brigadoon Elementary School, Federal Way, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Wandap. 2
The Dresses Gamep. 8
A Bright Blue Dayp. 19
The Contestp. 34
The Hundred Dressesp. 40
Up on Boggins Heightsp. 51
The Letter to Room 13p. 64
Wandap. 2
The Dresses Gamep. 8
A Bright Blue Dayp. 19
The Contestp. 34
The Hundred Dressesp. 40
Up on Boggins Heightsp. 51
The Letter to Room 13p. 64