Cover image for Slave young, slave long : the American slave experience
Title:
Slave young, slave long : the American slave experience
Author:
Greene, Meg.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis, Minn. : Lerner Publications Co., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
88 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
Presents a social and cultural history of the American slave experience with emphasis on day to day life rather than the larger political context.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.7 3.0 4399.
ISBN:
9780822517399
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Central Library E443 .G76 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library E443 .G76 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Clearfield Library E443 .G76 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library E443 .G76 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library E443 .G76 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library E443 .G76 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This award-winning and positively reviewed series takes an in-depth look at patterns of change in ordinary people's lives. Diaries, letters, newspaper accounts, period literature, and other primary resources bring a sense of immediacy to each book, while sepia-toned photographs and illustrations further expand readers' understanding and appreciation.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-8. In quiet, direct prose, with sepia-toned historical prints and photographs on nearly every page, this account in the People's History series tells the bitter story of slavery in the U.S. The history is rooted in personal accounts, with many brief verbatim quotes from individual victims and perpetrators woven into the general narrative. Unfortunately, though Greene includes an extensive final bibliography, she gives no sources for any quotes. Even the citations from scholars are usually no more than the generic "historians estimate," which asks readers to put away critical thinking and trust the writer. This is especially frustrating because the personal dramatic words make you want to find out more. Still, this is an excellent, accessible introduction that can be read with more detailed accounts, such as those listed in the Booklist bibliography "Significant Books on Slavery in the U.S." [BKL F 15 99]. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-A well-done survey of American slavery told in an accessible style. Greene introduces the history of this "peculiar institution" and offers aspects of the day-to-day lives of slaves through personal narratives. The account begins with a 1664 Maryland law sentencing indentured servants to "service for life" and concludes with the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery in 1865. Using original quotes that include dialect, the narrative relates the many horrors of slavery as well as the comforts that those who were enslaved found in their families and religion. The author does not focus on details: the Middle Passage is simply described as the "journey to the New World" and there is little biographical information on the few familiar names mentioned, such as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass. A good, basic addition.-Andrew Medlar, Chicago Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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