Cover image for Taking care of Sister Bear
Title:
Taking care of Sister Bear
Author:
Scheffler, Ursel.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Kein Kuss für Bärenschwester. English
Publication Information:
New York : Doubleday Books for Young Readers, 1999.

©1998
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
Little Bear becomes annoyed with his baby sister, but when she gets lost, he realizes how much he loves her.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 31879.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780385326605
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Little Bear has a new sister. Now he's not the baby anymore. There's no room on Mama Bear's lap when she's holding Sister Bear. And Sister Bear's clumsy paws knock over Little Bear's toys. A baby sister is really no fun at all! Little Bear discovers the pains and the pleasures of being an older sibling in this funny, warmhearted look at the tough job of adjusting to a new baby in the family.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-6. The delicate feelings of displacement when a child must adjust to sharing parental attention and affections with a younger sibling are conveyed here aptly, though anthropomorphically to the max. Living in a cozy log cabin with solid log furnishings is Little Bear, his Mama, Papa, and baby sister. Wensell's lushly colored landscapes are reminiscent of saccharine television cartoons in their portrayal of sister bear chasing butterflies and of a raccoon washing its laundry in the river. Yet the artist conveys genuine human emotions in his expressive characterizations: even though readers can't see Little Bear's face, they can sense dejection in his stooped shoulders when Mama sends him outside to play by himself while she feeds the baby. Similarly, the young bear's fear and distress over losing his little sister in the forest are evident in his wide-eyed face. Youngsters will embrace these bears that reflect the trials and love of every human family's adjustment to new additions. --Ellen Mandel


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1 Little Bear's baby sister takes up Mama's lap and knocks over towers "with her clumsy paws"; she ruins all of his fun. When Papa and Mama go off to pick mushrooms and berries, Little Bear is left in charge of her. His friend, Willy, convinces him to wake the baby and take her fishing with them. When she continues to get in the way, Little Bear offers Willy a fair trade: the baby for a bucket of fish. The fish are caught and the transaction is nearly complete when the friends realize that Sister is gone. They search to no avail, unaware that she went home hours ago, escorted by a friendly raccoon. After dark, Little Bear's family finally finds him in the forest. Happily reunited, he even gives "his baby sister a big fat bear kiss." Originally published in German, this gentle story is a welcome addition to the number of titles on pesky siblings. Wensell's realistic, soft watercolor illustrations add tenderness to the predictable tale. Olga R. Barnes, Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.