Cover image for Farolitos for Abuelo
Title:
Farolitos for Abuelo
Author:
Anaya, Rudolfo A.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, 1998.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
When Luz's beloved grandfather dies, she places luminaria around his grave on Christmas Eve as a way of remembering him.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786821860

9780786802371
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC.BK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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PIC.BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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On Order

Summary

Summary

With the passing of the winter storms and the promise of spring in the air, Luz is eager to go fishing with Abuelo. While fishing, Abuelo dives into the frigid river to save a young boy from drowning, and soon after, dies of pneumonia.

Luz bravely goes through the year keeping Abuelo's memory alive by planting and harvesting his garden as he taught her. And during her first Christmas without her abuelo, Luz carries on the tradition of lighting farolitos.


Summary

When Luz's beloved grandfather dies, she places farolitos, or small candles, around his grave on Christmas Eve as a way of remembering him.


Author Notes

Rudolfo Anaya, an educator and author, was born on October 30, 1937, in Pastura, New Mexico. He earned a B.A. in English in 1963, an M.A. in 1968 and a second M.A. in Guidance Counseling in 1972 from the University of New Mexico.

During the 1960s, Anaya taught in the Albuquerque public schools. In 1974 he began to teach at the University of New Mexico and earned the title of professor emeritus in 1993.

Anaya's first novel, Bless Me, Ultima began as a trilogy including Heart of Aztlan (1976), and Tortuga (1979). This loose trilogy based on his life experience as a Chicano child, formed Anaya's reputation. Anaya mixed old Spanish folk tales based on the oral tradition with a theme of loss, specifically the loss of religious belief.

In 1993, he won the PEN West Center Fiction Award for his novel Albuquerque. 1995 Anaya received both the El Fuego Nuevo Award from the Mexican American Educators and the Excellence in Humanities Award from the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities.

Anaya has lectured extensively around the world. His works have been translated into many languages such as Italian, Russian and Japanese. With his wife Patricia, he founded the Aztlan Premio, a prize encouraging Chicano writers. Anaya resides in Albuquerque.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Rudolfo Anaya, an educator and author, was born on October 30, 1937, in Pastura, New Mexico. He earned a B.A. in English in 1963, an M.A. in 1968 and a second M.A. in Guidance Counseling in 1972 from the University of New Mexico.

During the 1960s, Anaya taught in the Albuquerque public schools. In 1974 he began to teach at the University of New Mexico and earned the title of professor emeritus in 1993.

Anaya's first novel, Bless Me, Ultima began as a trilogy including Heart of Aztlan (1976), and Tortuga (1979). This loose trilogy based on his life experience as a Chicano child, formed Anaya's reputation. Anaya mixed old Spanish folk tales based on the oral tradition with a theme of loss, specifically the loss of religious belief.

In 1993, he won the PEN West Center Fiction Award for his novel Albuquerque. 1995 Anaya received both the El Fuego Nuevo Award from the Mexican American Educators and the Excellence in Humanities Award from the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities.

Anaya has lectured extensively around the world. His works have been translated into many languages such as Italian, Russian and Japanese. With his wife Patricia, he founded the Aztlan Premio, a prize encouraging Chicano writers. Anaya resides in Albuquerque.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Readers again meet Luz and her grandfather, introduced in The Farolitos of Christmas (Hyperion, 1995), shortly before he passes away. Through the seasons, Luz mourns the loss of Abuelo and keeps his memory alive by working in their garden in the summer and harvesting it in the fall. When Christmas comes, the girl places farolitos around his grave, and when the other townspeople see the warm, festive sight, they follow suit and a tradition is born. The figures in the oil paintings are again modeled after Gonzales's friends and family and the lanterns give the illustrations a luminous glow. The vibrant colors further enliven the narrative. Spanish words are incorporated throughout. A touching story that works best for sharing one-on-one.-T.T. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Readers again meet Luz and her grandfather, introduced in The Farolitos of Christmas (Hyperion, 1995), shortly before he passes away. Through the seasons, Luz mourns the loss of Abuelo and keeps his memory alive by working in their garden in the summer and harvesting it in the fall. When Christmas comes, the girl places farolitos around his grave, and when the other townspeople see the warm, festive sight, they follow suit and a tradition is born. The figures in the oil paintings are again modeled after Gonzales's friends and family and the lanterns give the illustrations a luminous glow. The vibrant colors further enliven the narrative. Spanish words are incorporated throughout. A touching story that works best for sharing one-on-one.-T.T. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.