Cover image for Too many time machines : or, the incredible story of how I went back in time, met Babe ruth, and discovered the secret of home run hitting
Title:
Too many time machines : or, the incredible story of how I went back in time, met Babe ruth, and discovered the secret of home run hitting
Author:
Stamaty, Mark Alan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Viking, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Roger uses his time machine to visit Babe Ruth and learn some of the secrets of The Babe's success, enabling Roger's team to win the championship.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780670884773
Format :
Book

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Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

When Roger's teammates take off in their time machines, ditching little-league practice right before the championship game, Roger gets pretty steamed up. Then Roger's dad suggests that the perfect way for Roger to use his time machine is to go back to 1927 and meet Babe Ruth. What follows is the biggest adventure of Roger's life, and Babe Ruth's, too!

Too Many Time Machines is a unique and very cool book for kids -- a graphic novel that features full page spreads along with comic-strip style art that's perfect for comics enthusiasts, baseball fans, and anyone who loves science fiction and humor.


Author Notes

Mark Alan Stamaty is a political cartoonist who has published five children's books as well as several collections of his political cartoons, Washingtoon and MacDoodle St . His work has also appeared in dozens of magazines including The New Yorker, Time , and The New York Times Magazine . He lives in New York City.
Mark Alan Stamaty is a political cartoonist who has published five children's books as well as several collections of his political cartoons, Washingtoon and MacDoodle St . His work has also appeared in dozens of magazines including The New Yorker, Time , and The New York Times Magazine . He lives in New York City.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this imaginative cartoon caper, time machines, looking like a jazzed-up cross between spaceships and bumper cars, are as common as Game Boys: all the kids have them. To the frustration of baseball-obsessed Roger, his teammates are too busy helping Michelangelo paint the Sistine Chapel or entertaining Catherine the Great to practice for the baseball championship. Roger himself has no interest in his time machine√Ąuntil his father suggests that he look up Babe Ruth. After the boy and his hero throw a discus in ancient Athens ("Oh, heck! They're just playing Frisbee!" complains Roger), Babe shares some power-hitting tips with the protagonist. Roger goes on to win the championship pretty much single-handedly ("We're the best!" "And we didn't even need to practice!" his teammates exult). Stamaty (Minnie Maloney and Macaroni, and creator of the nationally syndicated comic strip "Washingtoon") combines a healthy irreverence for history ("I'm late for my lunch date with Julius Caesar!" rages Cleopatra at one point) with plenty of affection for baseball and Babe Ruth. He mixes up a comic-strip format of panel art and dialog boxes with a more traditional picturebook format, so the text and the detailed black-and-white artwork interact in a variety of ways. Roger's picture-perfect suburban town of sidewalks and front porches offers an excellent foil for the ludicrous events. A droll, far-out story. Ages 8-up. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Roger is angry because his teammates would rather gallivant off in their personal time machines than practice for the upcoming championship game. The boy's low opinion of time travel changes, however, when his father suggests that Roger go back to get some tips from Babe Ruth. As it turns out, the Babe is willing, in exchange for a trip to ancient Greece, and after a week's hitting and fielding instruction, Roger carries his rusty team to glory. Naturally, all of the players want to buckle down after that, except for Roger, who's off with Ruth to visit Leonardo da Vinci. Yes, it's trite, and all of the time machines in this graphic novel look like crosses between old-fashioned helicopters and elaborately decorated eggs. Stamaty's uncolored panels create a visual monotony that is reinforced by the peg-toothed sameness of his people. Still, the Babe comes across as an engagingly huge, friendly kid, and variations both in page design and text placement, plus the sheer zaniness of the premise, may keep readers turning the pages.-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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