Cover image for A gift of angels
Title:
A gift of angels
Author:
Bledsoe, Jerry.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Asheboro, N.C. : Down Home Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
149 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
General Note:
"Sequel to The angel doll : a Christmas story."--t.p.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9781878086808
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Critics proclaimed Jerry Bledsoe's bestseller, The Angel Doll, an instant classic and a family treasure. It sold more than 110,000 copies in hardcover, was excerpted in Good Housekeeping, selected by The Literary Guild, Doubleday Book Club, and Crossings Book Club, and was published in Germany and Japan. The mass market paperback will be released by St. Martin's Press in the fall of 1999, and a feature film is in production for release at Christmas 1999.In The Angel Doll, we met Whitey Black, who despite his poverty sets out to get an angel doll for his four-year-old sister because she loves The Littlest Angel story so much. Although his sister doesn't live to see her doll, we learn of another angel who many years later gives angel dolls to children in terminal hospital wards each Christmas.In this deeply moving sequel to The Angel Doll, Bledsoe tells the rest of the story and brings the characters full-circle to present day. A story of friendship, love, and giving, it is certain to bring tears to the eyes of all who read it -- even if they never heard of The Angel Doll.


Author Notes

Jerry Bledsoe was born July 14, 1941, in Danville, Virginia.

Bledsoe is a newspaperman. He writes true crime stories as well as humor columns. He has won several awards, including the National Headliners Award (1969) and the Young Newspaperman Award from the International Newspaper Promotion Association (1971).

As a writer Beldsoe focuses on North Carolina's land and people. Some of his titles include Some Funny Things Happened on the Way Back to the Land (1976), Visitin' with Carolina People (1980), and Blood Games: A True Account of Family Murder (1991). Blue Horizons: Faces and Places from a Bicycle Journey along the Blue Ridge Parkway was published in 1993. Before He Wakes: A True Story of Money, Marriage, Sex and Murder appeared in 1994.

Bledsoe lives in Ashboro, North Carolina.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

This is Bledsoe's sequel to his 1996 holiday favorite The Angel Doll, continuing the story of young Whitey Black, whose devotion to his four-year-old polio-crippled sister was the subject of the earlier book, narrated by his paper-route partner and buddy. Here Bledsoe relates the circumstances surrounding the birth of The Angel Doll. The grown-up narrator is now a veteran newspaper reporter, reminiscing on his old friend Whitey. Since he never knew Whitey's real name, trying to find him seems impossible. As in real life, the reporter writes The Angel Doll (the outline of the previous book is synopsized so new readers get the gist) hoping to generate enough attention to bring Whitey forth. The reception of that book is recapitulated (an excerpt in Good Housekeeping, etc.), and amid the crush of readings and publicity events, the narrator meets Whitey's daughter, Sandy (named after Whitey's little sister). Sandy provides the missing information about her father's life and gives the narrator a box of Whitey's correspondence, including the revealing letters he wrote while serving in Vietnam. Whitey was a highly decorated lieutenant who died trying to save a little Vietnamese girl from sniper gunfire. The narrator pays his respects to his brave old friend by giving Whitey's young granddaughter, Laurel, a very special Christmas gift. When the story, simple in itself, veers into issues such as publishing and war heroism, much of its elemental power dissipates. While the tale also gets muddled with too many nostalgic details of various restaurants, towns, famous acquaintances and auxiliary characters, Bledsoe's message is undeniably sweet-spirited, and this entre‚ into the feel-good holiday genre should prove popular for all ages. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved