Cover image for Peanuts : a golden celebration : the art and the story of the world's best-loved comic strip
Title:
Peanuts : a golden celebration : the art and the story of the world's best-loved comic strip
Author:
Schulz, Charles M. (Charles Monroe), 1922-2000.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
254 pages : chielfly illustrations (some color) ; 32 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780965863414

9780062702449
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Newstead Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Oversize
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Riverside Branch Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Concord Library PN6728.P4 S32494 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Will Charlie Brown ever get to kick the footballs? Will Schroeder finally return Lucy's love? Will Linus give up his security blanket? Will Peppermint Party ever pass a test? And, most importantly will Snoopy--that canine literary ace--ever be published?

"To take a blank piece of paper and draw characters that people love and worry about is extremely satisfying. It really does not matter what you are called or where your work is placed as long as it brings some kind of joy to some person some place."

-- Charles Schulz

Peanuts: A Golden Celebration honors the momentous 50th anniversary of Charlie Brown and the gang with over 1,000 carefully selected strips that tell the story of Peanutslike no other book before. In Schulz's own words we learn how he came to create the world's most popular comic strip characters from nostalgic and sometimes painful memories of growing up--such as the agony of classroom Valentine exchange and the longing for a little red-haired girl.

From the debut of Peanuts on October 2, 1950, to the golden jubilee, here are fifty years of the favorite episodes and the..."firsts," such as the first time Lucy pulled the football away from Charlie Brown. Included are scenes from the beloved Charlie Brown television. specials and the latest revival of the Broadway musical, You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown.

These are the strips and events that have made Peanuts an awesome phenomenon, appearing in 2,600 newspapers worldwide everyday. Not bad for a round-headed kid called Charlie Brown.

Let the celebration begin!


Author Notes

Charles Monroe Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on November 26, 1922. He started drawing at a young age, practicing with popular characters such as Popeye. When he was 15, one of his pictures appeared as an illustration in "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" He took a correspondence course with Art Instruction Inc., where he later taught, and served in the Army during World War II.

The Peanuts (originally called Li'l Folks, a name that was changed by the United Feature Syndicate) began syndication on October 2, 1950, when it appeared in seven newspapers. Schulz's work went on to become the most popular syndicated comic strip of all time, appearing in 2600 papers in 75 countries around the world. Schulz drew everyone of the more than 18,250 Peanuts strips himself and his contract stipulated that no one else would ever draw them.

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the rest of the Peanuts Gang also appear in a number of television specials, the first of which was A Charlie Brown Christmas (1964), created with animator Bill Melendez. It is one of the most watched and best loved television shows in history and winner of an Emmy and a Peabody.

Charles Schulz has been inducted into the Cartoonists Hall of Fame and won numerous awards. He was given Reuben Awards by the National Cartoonists Society in 1955 and 1964, the Yale Humor Award (1956), the School Bell Award from the National Education Society (1960), and the Ordre des Artes et des Lettres from the French Ministry of Culture. In 1990, his work was shown at the Louvre.

Schulz retired after being diagnosed with colon cancer. The final daily Peanuts strip appeared in January 3, 2000 and the final Sunday strip, along with a letter of thanks to his editors and fans, appeared on February 13, 2000. Schulz died in his home in Santa Rosa, California on February 12, 2000 within hours of the publication of his farewell strip.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Charles Monroe Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on November 26, 1922. He started drawing at a young age, practicing with popular characters such as Popeye. When he was 15, one of his pictures appeared as an illustration in "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" He took a correspondence course with Art Instruction Inc., where he later taught, and served in the Army during World War II.

The Peanuts (originally called Li'l Folks, a name that was changed by the United Feature Syndicate) began syndication on October 2, 1950, when it appeared in seven newspapers. Schulz's work went on to become the most popular syndicated comic strip of all time, appearing in 2600 papers in 75 countries around the world. Schulz drew everyone of the more than 18,250 Peanuts strips himself and his contract stipulated that no one else would ever draw them.

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the rest of the Peanuts Gang also appear in a number of television specials, the first of which was A Charlie Brown Christmas (1964), created with animator Bill Melendez. It is one of the most watched and best loved television shows in history and winner of an Emmy and a Peabody.

Charles Schulz has been inducted into the Cartoonists Hall of Fame and won numerous awards. He was given Reuben Awards by the National Cartoonists Society in 1955 and 1964, the Yale Humor Award (1956), the School Bell Award from the National Education Society (1960), and the Ordre des Artes et des Lettres from the French Ministry of Culture. In 1990, his work was shown at the Louvre.

Schulz retired after being diagnosed with colon cancer. The final daily Peanuts strip appeared in January 3, 2000 and the final Sunday strip, along with a letter of thanks to his editors and fans, appeared on February 13, 2000. Schulz died in his home in Santa Rosa, California on February 12, 2000 within hours of the publication of his farewell strip.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

If anything on the comics page is an institution, it is "Peanuts," which marks its 50th anniversary next year. Part of the celebration is this lavish collection documenting the strip's history. Among the 1,000 strips it reprints are early appearances of hapless but game Charlie Brown, his dog Snoopy, "fussbudget" Lucy, and her blanket-toting brother Linus, as well as of such comparative newcomers as Peppermint Patty and Snoopy's brother Spike. Such strip motifs as the Great Pumpkin and Charlie Brown on the pitcher's mound are traced, as are Snoopy's evolution from mute pet to philosopher and World War I flying ace and the strip's transmogrification into animated cartoons and a Broadway musical. Creator Schulz's annotations reveal how much thought goes into the deceptively simple comic. "Peanuts" is so long-lived that it is easy to take for granted. This is a nice reminder of how substantial and how remarkably consistent Schulz's half century of work is. Here's hoping the peanuts never grow up and that Charlie Brown never wises up to Lucy's football trick. --Gordon Flagg


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