Cover image for The Pushcart prize, XXIV, 2000 : best of the small presses
Title:
The Pushcart prize, XXIV, 2000 : best of the small presses
Author:
Henderson, Bill, 1941-
Publication Information:
Wainscott, N.Y. : Pushcart Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
585 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
"An annual small press reader"
Language:
English
Contents:
The Mansion on the Hill / Rick Moody -- In Search of Miracles / memoir by Ann Hood -- Building a Painting a Home / poem by Bob Hicock -- Seed / Mary Yuarki Waters -- Mitch / poem by Robert Creeley -- The First Men / Stacey Richter -- The Sheriff goes to Church / Robert Coover -- Lizard / poem by Susan Hahn -- The Best Girlfriend You Never Had / Pam Houston -- The Houses of Double Women / Julian Anderson -- The Dog Years / poem by Tony Hoagland -- The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Animal Kingdom / Dan Chaon -- Borrowed Finery / memoir by Paula Fox -- Faithfulness / poem by Forrest Gander -- Also Love You / poem by Reginald Shepherd -- Nachman / Leonard Michaels -- The Serenity Prayer / Elisabeth Sifton -- All the Aphrodisiacs / poem by Cathy Hong -- Snow Dreams / Tom Bailey -- At Niaux / poem by Laurie Sheck -- Miss Famous / Robert Boswell -- Gravitas / poem by Elizabeth Alexander -- Carlos / poem by Theodore Deppe -- Neon Effects / Emily Hiestand -- The Gardens of Kyoto / Kate Walbert -- The Loop, the Snow, Their Daughters, the Rain / Liza Wieland -- Olympic Rain Forest / poem by Jane Cooper -- The Disappearing Teapot / memoir by Alice Mattison -- Sand, Flies & Fish / poem by Mong-Lan -- What I Eat / Charlotte Morgan -- From the Prado Rotunda: The Family of Charles IV, and Others / poem by Alicia Ostriker -- Oblivion, Nebraska / Peter Moore Smith -- Odd Collections / Alexander Theroux -- Errata Mystagogia / poem by Bruce Beasley -- The Dead Boy at Your Window / Bruce Holland Rogers -- Invisible Man / poem by Jas. Mardis -- Dear Mother / Harry Mathews -- The Girls Learn to Levitate / poem by Adrienne Su -- The March of the Novel through History: the Testimony of my Grandfather's Bookcase / Amitav Ghosh -- A Meditation / poem by Gail N. Harada -- The Talking Cure / Frederick Busch -- Provenance / poem by Joseph Stroud -- Very, Very Red / Diane Williams -- The Poor Angel / poem by Ray Gonzales -- A Party on the Way to Rome / poem by Christopher Howell -- What They Did / David Means -- Diary / poem by Susan Wood -- Basha Leah / memoir by Brenda Miller -- For Brigit in Illinois / poem by Renee Ashley -- Harry Ginsberg / Charles Baxter -- The Sky Blue Dress / poem by Cathy Song -- Love or Nothing / poem by Hugh Coyle -- Self Knowledge / Richard Bausch -- Son of Stet / poem by John Kistner -- The Sea in Mourning / poem by Eduardo Urios-Aparisi -- The Wedding Jester / Steve Stern -- Swan / poem by Oleh Lysheha -- Daughter-Mother-Maya-Seeta / poem by Reetika Vazirani -- Living to Tell the Tale / memoir by Gabriel Garcia Marquez -- Deer Table Legs / poem by Katayoon Zandvakili -- Love Letters / poem by Michael Burkard.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781888889192
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

In the best Pushcart tradition, this fascinating edition combines the work of today's luminaries with a host of new talents, creating a wholly original amalgam of diverse voices. The most honored literary series in America, The Pushcart Prize has been chosen for many Book-of-the-Month Club and Quality Paperback Book Club selections, named a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times, and hailed with Pushcart Press by Publishers Weekly as "among the most influential in the development of the American book business over the past 125 years


Author Notes

Bill Henderson is the author of "The Kid That Could", a novel, & two memoirs, "His Son" & "Her Father". He is the founder & publisher of Pushcart Press & the editor of the acclaimed Pushcart Prize series. He lives on Long Island & in Maine.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The Pushcart Prize anthologies extend the reach of small presses and literary magazines and comprise a vital archive of American letters, framing, as each compelling volume does, a mosaic of the year's freshest writing. The entire spectrum of creative literature is covered as poems nestle between works of fiction, memoirs, and essays, and new writers follow in the footsteps of established voices. Editor Henderson, sensitive, as always, to both losses and gains, begins with a tribute to the late Andre Dubus, a master short-story writer and essayist. The collection itself then begins with an incantatory work of fiction by Rick Moody, which introduces a style that can best be described as humor with a concealed weapon, a voice also heard in a terrifically unnerving story by Stacy Richter, and Steve Stern's edgy satire, "The Wedding Jester." This year's poets include Bob Hicok, Susan Hahn, and Elizabeth Alexander. Ann Hood and Pam Houston are present as memoirists, and high standards for essay writing are set by Alexander Theroux and Amitav Ghosh. --Donna Seaman


Publisher's Weekly Review

The 24th annual anthology honors those essays, short stories and poems nominated by the small magazines in which they have been published. In this year's collection of winners, there are notable essays from Gabriel Garc¡a M rquez, Ann Hood, Alice Mattison and Paula's Fox's memoir is characteristically unsentimental but deeply affecting; Elizabeth Sifton's is rich with insight and cultural history. Lesser-known writers also shine. "Neon Effects," a memoir by Emily Hiestand, recounts her sudden desire to put blue neon tubing under the carriage of her car, low-rider/U.F.O.-style. It's a little gem of eccentric vision, with fun quirks like a footnote on the phrase "no problem." "Odd Collections" by Alexander Theroux details the obsessions of collectors, from the man in Pittsburgh who hoards moist towelettes to the Asian prostitutes who "collect fluff from the navels of their clients." Stacy Richter's stellar, hilarious fiction, "The First Men," is the rant of a high school teacher, Miss Roberts, who owes money to a drug-dealing student. When she runs into her drug dealer's Neanderthal but undeniably cute enforcer at the mall, her survival instinct fails her. The protagonist of the novella "The Wedding Jester," by Steve Stern, is a washed-up writer tired of his work retelling Jewish folktales, who accompanies his mother to a wedding in the Catskills where the bride is possessed by a dybbuk with a dirty mouth. Other short fiction comes from the pens of Leonard Michaels, Robert Coover, Frederick Busch, Robert Boswell, Rick Moody, Pam Houston and Charles Baxter. The poems represent a range of styles and schools, with entries by well-known poets such as Robert Creeley and Jane Cooper and less familiar voices. Ray Gonzalez's poem "The Poor Angel" is a standout, surrealist liturgy with overtones of Artaud, and Bob Hickok's "Building a Painting a Home" is a wistful wonder of domestic meditation. Overall, it's a fascinating compilation, reflecting the year's varied bounty of literary feats, as selected by an equally varied pool of editors and writers in the field. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This latest edition of the annual compilation of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction from small and independent presses contains 65 pieces, plus a fine introduction by Pushcart Press's founder and editor, Henderson. As always, the pieces selected are of uniform high quality, while appealing to a variety of different tastes. For example, this reviewer especially liked those that dealt with religious themes: Erin McGraw's "Punchline" is a story about a dedicated priest whose life and career become derailed after a series of unfortunate incidents; Anthony Wallace's "The Old Priest" details the complex relationship between the title character and a would-be writer. In nonfiction, Ann Patchett's beautiful and moving "The Mercies" is a tribute to a nun, her teacher and friend Sister Nena; while Shozan Jack Haubner's memoir, "A Zen Zealot Comes Home," provides a family portrait of a Zen Buddhist monk and his conflicts with his parents. VERDICT This entry in the series is a must-purchase for most public and undergraduate libraries and will be valuable to all readers interested in the current state of fiction, poetry, essay writing, and memoir. -Morris Hounion, New York City Coll. of Technology Lib., CUNY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.