Cover image for Encyclopedia Brown and the case of the slippery salamander
Title:
Encyclopedia Brown and the case of the slippery salamander
Author:
Sobol, Donald J., 1924-2012.
Publication Information:
New York : Delacorte Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
87 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
Encyclopedia Brown, the super sleuth in sneakers, solves ten new mysteries, including "The Case of the Slippery Salamander, " "The Case of the Banana Burglar, " and "The Case of the Dead Cockroach."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
710 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.8 2.0 32015.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780385325790
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Easy Fiction
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

A new title in the bestselling series about the world's greatest supersleuth in sneakers! A slippery salamander, a banana burglar, a judge who's run away, and a presidential toothbrush . . . these are just some of the clues that the world's greatest young detective must use to solve 10 all-new mysteries. Young readers can try to solve the cases alongside Encyclopedia--the answers to all the mysteries are in the back of the book.


Author Notes

Donald J. Sobol was born in the Bronx, New York on October 4, 1924. During World War II, he served in the Army as a sergeant in a combat engineer battalion in the Pacific. He received a B.A. degree from Oberlin College. He worked as a copy boy and then a reporter at The New York Sun and The Long Island Daily Press. In 1959, he began writing a syndicated fiction column called Two-Minute Mysteries.

He is the creator of the Encyclopedia Brown series. His first book, Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective, was published in 1963. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 80 books. In 1976, he won an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for the Encyclopedia Brown series. He died from gastric lymphoma on July 11, 2012 at the age of 87.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. Ten-year-old supersleuth Leroy "Encyclopedia" Brown is back in a book that will most likely be as popular as others in the series despite stereotypes like bad guy Bugs Meany and over-the-top dialogue ("We've got to stop the game, Sally! That man never worked as an umpire before. He's a major-league liar!") The series' success lies in its format. Budding detectives love the excitement of trying to solve cases on their own or with a buddy, and, as usual, solutions for the cases presented here are provided at the end of the book. Many youngsters also like the fact that the mysteries are only a few pages long: they can read a complete story with a beginning, middle, and end without a big investment of time. The 10 new mysteries are pretty good, considering how difficult it is to set up the elements of a story in such a limited space. The best part is, once kids are hooked on this book, there are 21 others to try, with the possibility of more to follow. --Lauren Peterson


Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Police Chief Brown's 10-year-old son Leroy, better known as Encyclopedia, is still busy keeping Idaville safe from criminals and mischief-makers. Some of the cases the supersleuth encounters involve a dead cockroach, a runaway judge, a peacock's egg, and a stolen surfboard. Of course, the young detective solves these mysteries with ease, which is more than will be said for his many readers. Encyclopedia got his name "because his brain was filled with more facts than a reference book." In order to solve the cases, children will need to know a vast amount of trivial information, something most youngsters do not have. However, fans of the sneaker-clad sleuth will still be happy to see volume 22 in the series sitting on their library shelves.-Elaine Lesh Morgan, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.