Cover image for A bar in Brooklyn : novellas & stories, 1970-1978
Title:
A bar in Brooklyn : novellas & stories, 1970-1978
Author:
Codrescu, Andrei, 1946-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Santa Rosa, CA : Black Sparrow Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
237 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Word to the reader -- Monsieur Teste in America -- Samba de los Agentes -- Three simple hearts -- Tenderness -- Perfume -- The herald -- The old couple -- Petra -- Julie -- The babysitter -- A bar in Brooklyn.
ISBN:
9781574230987

9781574230994

9781574230970
Format :
Book

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Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Since emigrating to the U.S. from the Nosferatu darknesses of his native Romania in 1966, Andrei Codrescu has blazed a rocket-bright trail across the cultural landscape of his adopted country, gaining a national audience as public radio commentator, television personality and editor of the radical literary journal Exquisite Corpse. He has also commanded considerable critical recognition for his poetry (Alien Candor, Black Sparrow, 1996), and fiction (most notably, his novel about his Transylvanian homeland, The Blood Countess, 1995).


Summary

Since emigrating to the U.S. from the Nosferatu darknesses of his native Romania in 1966, Andrei Codrescu has blazed a rocket-bright trail across the cultural landscape of his adopted country, gaining a national audience as public radio commentator, television personality and editor of the radical literary journal Exquisite Corpse. He has also commanded considerable critical recognition for his poetry (Alien Candor, Black Sparrow, 1996), and fiction (most notably, his novel about his Transylvanian homeland, The Blood Countess, 1995).


Summary

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Author Notes

Romanian-born poet and essayist Andrei Codrescu, who also utilizes the pen names Betty Laredo and Maria Parfeni, emigrated to the United States in 1966. Codrescu earned a B.A. at the University of Bucharest, and has taught at numerous academic institutions including Johns Hopkins, the University of Baltimore, and Louisiana State University.

Codrescu worked for National Public Radio as a commentator and has been featured on ABC News' Nightline. Some of Codrescu's short stories and novels include his first poetry collection, License to Carry a Gun and a memoir entitled In America's Shoe.

Throughout the years, Codrescu has been awarded many honors including the Big Table Poetry Award, General Electric Foundation Poetry Prize, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships for poetry, editing, and radio.

His titles include The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess, The Poetry Lesson, and Whatever Gets You through the Night: A Story of Sheherezade and the Arabian Entertainments.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Romanian-born poet and essayist Andrei Codrescu, who also utilizes the pen names Betty Laredo and Maria Parfeni, emigrated to the United States in 1966. Codrescu earned a B.A. at the University of Bucharest, and has taught at numerous academic institutions including Johns Hopkins, the University of Baltimore, and Louisiana State University.

Codrescu worked for National Public Radio as a commentator and has been featured on ABC News' Nightline. Some of Codrescu's short stories and novels include his first poetry collection, License to Carry a Gun and a memoir entitled In America's Shoe.

Throughout the years, Codrescu has been awarded many honors including the Big Table Poetry Award, General Electric Foundation Poetry Prize, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships for poetry, editing, and radio.

His titles include The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess, The Poetry Lesson, and Whatever Gets You through the Night: A Story of Sheherezade and the Arabian Entertainments.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Romanian-born poet and essayist Andrei Codrescu, who also utilizes the pen names Betty Laredo and Maria Parfeni, emigrated to the United States in 1966. Codrescu earned a B.A. at the University of Bucharest, and has taught at numerous academic institutions including Johns Hopkins, the University of Baltimore, and Louisiana State University.

Codrescu worked for National Public Radio as a commentator and has been featured on ABC News' Nightline. Some of Codrescu's short stories and novels include his first poetry collection, License to Carry a Gun and a memoir entitled In America's Shoe.

Throughout the years, Codrescu has been awarded many honors including the Big Table Poetry Award, General Electric Foundation Poetry Prize, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships for poetry, editing, and radio.

His titles include The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess, The Poetry Lesson, and Whatever Gets You through the Night: A Story of Sheherezade and the Arabian Entertainments.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Publisher's Weekly Review

Once best known for activities outside the realm of fictionÄas an NPR commentator and editor of the literary journal Exquisite CorpseÄCodrescu has also achieved moderate renown as a surrealist poet. The 1995 publication of Blood Countess brought him into the ranks of acclaimed novelists, which may explain why Black Sparrow has chosen to issue a collection of his apprentice fiction written more than 20 years ago. These experimental tales (four novellas and seven very short stories) explore in one way or another what it means to be an American. For Codrescu, a Romanian immigrant, this question is fraught with the weight and absurdity of popular culture, and the freewheeling associations of the '70s make their presence felt. The narrator of the hallucinatory "Perfume" watches children counting in a playground and imagines them counting all the way to infinity, "if the hamburgers they eat don't get there first." That toneÄcheeky and challengingÄsurfaces throughout and imbues the uneven collection with a flashy, playful wit. Along with his madcap sense of the absurd, Codrescu also demonstrates a firm grasp of French literature. The opening novella brings Paul Val‚ry's Monsieur Teste to America, while another (Codrescu tells us in the introduction) is intended to echo Flaubert. But the strongest French influence here is that of the nouveau roman, which abandons structure in favor of abstract ideas and an intent to shock. That aestheticÄthe belief that lack of control somehow makes art more legitimateÄgives some of these stories the momentum and exhilaration of a runaway train. Other stories simply become mired in the frantic purgings of an unfiltered id. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Codrescu, Romanian-born poet, novelist, and National Public Radio commentator, here collects some of his earliest writings, not all of which have appeared previously in print. He confides in the preface that at the time he wrote a variety of fiction types while attending to his "real business" of writing poetry. He declares several pieces presented from a feminine point of view "experimental"; they were written at a time when he "didn't yet feel at home" in the female psyche. As in his later works, Codrescu flaunts a keen sense of humor in his sexually infused prose. His perspective as a foreigner adapting to the cultural and social upheaval in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s is unique. These early, surreal pieces make for challenging reading, but the hallucinogenic quality is in keeping with the culture of the time. For academic libraries.ÄDianna Moeller, OCLC/WLN Pacific Northwest Svc. Ctr., Lacey, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Once best known for activities outside the realm of fictionÄas an NPR commentator and editor of the literary journal Exquisite CorpseÄCodrescu has also achieved moderate renown as a surrealist poet. The 1995 publication of Blood Countess brought him into the ranks of acclaimed novelists, which may explain why Black Sparrow has chosen to issue a collection of his apprentice fiction written more than 20 years ago. These experimental tales (four novellas and seven very short stories) explore in one way or another what it means to be an American. For Codrescu, a Romanian immigrant, this question is fraught with the weight and absurdity of popular culture, and the freewheeling associations of the '70s make their presence felt. The narrator of the hallucinatory "Perfume" watches children counting in a playground and imagines them counting all the way to infinity, "if the hamburgers they eat don't get there first." That toneÄcheeky and challengingÄsurfaces throughout and imbues the uneven collection with a flashy, playful wit. Along with his madcap sense of the absurd, Codrescu also demonstrates a firm grasp of French literature. The opening novella brings Paul Val‚ry's Monsieur Teste to America, while another (Codrescu tells us in the introduction) is intended to echo Flaubert. But the strongest French influence here is that of the nouveau roman, which abandons structure in favor of abstract ideas and an intent to shock. That aestheticÄthe belief that lack of control somehow makes art more legitimateÄgives some of these stories the momentum and exhilaration of a runaway train. Other stories simply become mired in the frantic purgings of an unfiltered id. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Codrescu, Romanian-born poet, novelist, and National Public Radio commentator, here collects some of his earliest writings, not all of which have appeared previously in print. He confides in the preface that at the time he wrote a variety of fiction types while attending to his "real business" of writing poetry. He declares several pieces presented from a feminine point of view "experimental"; they were written at a time when he "didn't yet feel at home" in the female psyche. As in his later works, Codrescu flaunts a keen sense of humor in his sexually infused prose. His perspective as a foreigner adapting to the cultural and social upheaval in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s is unique. These early, surreal pieces make for challenging reading, but the hallucinogenic quality is in keeping with the culture of the time. For academic libraries.ÄDianna Moeller, OCLC/WLN Pacific Northwest Svc. Ctr., Lacey, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Once best known for activities outside the realm of fictionÄas an NPR commentator and editor of the literary journal Exquisite CorpseÄCodrescu has also achieved moderate renown as a surrealist poet. The 1995 publication of Blood Countess brought him into the ranks of acclaimed novelists, which may explain why Black Sparrow has chosen to issue a collection of his apprentice fiction written more than 20 years ago. These experimental tales (four novellas and seven very short stories) explore in one way or another what it means to be an American. For Codrescu, a Romanian immigrant, this question is fraught with the weight and absurdity of popular culture, and the freewheeling associations of the '70s make their presence felt. The narrator of the hallucinatory "Perfume" watches children counting in a playground and imagines them counting all the way to infinity, "if the hamburgers they eat don't get there first." That toneÄcheeky and challengingÄsurfaces throughout and imbues the uneven collection with a flashy, playful wit. Along with his madcap sense of the absurd, Codrescu also demonstrates a firm grasp of French literature. The opening novella brings Paul Val‚ry's Monsieur Teste to America, while another (Codrescu tells us in the introduction) is intended to echo Flaubert. But the strongest French influence here is that of the nouveau roman, which abandons structure in favor of abstract ideas and an intent to shock. That aestheticÄthe belief that lack of control somehow makes art more legitimateÄgives some of these stories the momentum and exhilaration of a runaway train. Other stories simply become mired in the frantic purgings of an unfiltered id. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Codrescu, Romanian-born poet, novelist, and National Public Radio commentator, here collects some of his earliest writings, not all of which have appeared previously in print. He confides in the preface that at the time he wrote a variety of fiction types while attending to his "real business" of writing poetry. He declares several pieces presented from a feminine point of view "experimental"; they were written at a time when he "didn't yet feel at home" in the female psyche. As in his later works, Codrescu flaunts a keen sense of humor in his sexually infused prose. His perspective as a foreigner adapting to the cultural and social upheaval in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s is unique. These early, surreal pieces make for challenging reading, but the hallucinogenic quality is in keeping with the culture of the time. For academic libraries.ÄDianna Moeller, OCLC/WLN Pacific Northwest Svc. Ctr., Lacey, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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