Cover image for Molière, four plays
Molière, four plays
Molière, 1622-1673.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Works. Selections. English. 1999
Publication Information:
Boston : International Pocket Library, [1999]

Physical Description:
333 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
The bourgeois gentleman -- The doctor in spite of himself -- The affected damsels -- The miser (regular edition) -- The miser (short edition).
Added Author:
Format :


Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Central Library PQ1825.E5 P47 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area

On Order



Moliere is considered the Shakespeare of France. Moliere's plays are enacted throughout the world in virtually every language, as much today as ever.

Author Notes

The French dramatist Moliere was born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin on January 15, 1622, in Paris. The son of a wealthy tapestry merchant, he had a penchant for the theater from childhood. In 1636, he was sent off to school at the Jesuit College of Claremont and in 1643, he embarked upon a 13-year career touring in provincial theater as a troupe member of Illustre Theatre, a group established by the family Bejarts. He married a daughter of the troupe, Armande Bejart, in 1662 and changed his name to Moliere.

The French King Louis XIV, becoming entranced with the troupe after seeing a performance of The Would-Be Gentleman, lent his support and charged Moliere with the production of comedy ballets in which he often used real-life human qualities as backdrops rather than settings from church or state. Soon, Moliere secured a position at the Palais-Royal and committed himself to the comic theater as a dramatist, actor, producer, and director.

Moliere is considered to be one of the preeminent French dramatists and writers of comedies; his work continues to delight audiences today. With L'Ecole des Femmes (The School for Wives) Moliere broke with the farce tradition, and the play, about the role played by women in society and their preparation for it, is regarded by many as the first great seriocomic work of French literature. In Tartuffe (1664), Moliere invented one of his famous comic types, that of a religious hypocrite, a character so realistic that the king forbade public performance of the play for five years. Moliere gave psychological depth to his characters, engaging them in facial antics and slapstick comedy, but with an underlying pathos.

Jean Baptiste Moliere died in 1673.

(Bowker Author Biography)

Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

This anthology of four 17th-century comedies by MoliŠre (Jean Baptiste Poquelin, 1622-73) is translated by Pergolizzi, a theater director and French teacher. Following the tradition of 16th-century Italian commedia dell'arte, MoliŠre has remained a popular playwright through the centuries. As a social critic, he used farce and satire to "[deal] with the common man and [poke] fun at the pretentiousness of the elite." This anthology comprises The Bourgeois Gentleman, The Doctor in Spite of Himself, The Affected Damsels, and The Miser (in both regular and shorter versions). The first three comedies are included in an earlier anthology of eight plays, translated by Morris Bishop of Cornell University (1957). This new translation is rendered in a more colloquial style, and the use of quick scenes and inclusion of seven musical scores with lyrics are better for production. The larger font size and clearer typographic layout also make this anthology more appealing. Recommended for both academic and public libraries.ÄMing-ming Shen Kuo, Ball State Univ. Lib., Muncie, IN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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