Cover image for Stars in the corps : movie actors in the United States Marines
Title:
Stars in the corps : movie actors in the United States Marines
Author:
Wise, James E., Jr., 1930-2013.
Publication Information:
Annapolis, Md. : Naval Institute Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
246 pages : illustrations, map, portraits ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781557509499
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN1998.2 .W56 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

A unique illustrated celebration of the relationship between Hollywood and the U.S. Marine Corps features the military histories of Steve McQueen, Gene Hackman, Harvey Keitel, Brian Dennehy, Ed McMahon, Sterling Hayden, and Lee Marvin, among others.


Author Notes

James Wise, a retired captain in the U.S. Navy who served as a naval aviator, is the coauthor of the other two books in this series. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Following the lead of their Stars in Blue (1997), about movie actors who served in the navy, Wise and Rehill sketch Hollywood stars who served in the Marine Corps. Nary a negative observation appears. All the fightin' thespians are represented as bold, true, clear-headed, and uncomplicated. Tyrone Power's spirit must be cackling in derision, given the usual tenor of posthumous commentary on the strikingly handsome, allegedly bisexual leading man. Wise and Rehill describe Power's early life in publicity-hack terms, summarize his film career, and account for his military service. The other profiles follow suit. Readers may chuckle cynically over the differences between these wholesome descriptions and commonly available rumor and innuendo about such matters as, for instance, Power's inability to carry on a completely faithful romance. "Tyrone Power was loved by everyone who knew him," we read. "Such as Errol Flynn," Hollywood dirt diggers Charles Higham and Kenneth Anger might retort. Still, Wise and Rehill provide congenial historical star trivia as well as unintentional cause for mirth. --Mike Tribby


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