Cover image for Women in science and engineering : choices for success
Title:
Women in science and engineering : choices for success
Author:
Selby, Cecily Cannan.
Publication Information:
New York : New York Academy of Sciences, 1999.
Physical Description:
xix, 263 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
Papers from a conference held in New York City, Mar. 12-13, 1998.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction to a 25th anniversary conference -- Creeping toward inclusivity in science: executive summary -- Personal reflections -- Working together to expand opportunity -- Invitied background papers -- Pt.1. Changes: what difference has the last twenty-five years made? -- Pt.2. Choices: what keeps women in science and engineering? -- The work -- The workplace -- The rewards -- Pt.3. Successes: which policies and pratices work? -- What promotes success in the private sector? -- What policies of government agencies are worth emulating? -- What promotes the development of women scientists in academia? -- Academic policies and practices -- Pt.4. The future: what have we learned and how can it help?
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781573311663

9781573311670
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This volume comprises papers that assess whether, where and how progress has taken place in the 25 years since the Academy held a conference entitled Women in Science: Determinants of Success and recommend ways of accelerating it on the basis of research and the best practices to be found in corporate, government and academic institutions. The participants and presenters come from large and small industries, colleges and universities, and government agancies; they also represent a cross section of the scientific world, ranging from student to Nobel laureate. The shared perspective of the conference was that increased diversity must be aided and abetted through substantive changes in the attitudes, policies and practices that inform how we educate and evaluate the workforce and how we manage the workplace.


Summary

This volume comprises papers that assess whether, where and how progress has taken place in the 25 years since the Academy held a conference entitled Women in Science: Determinants of Success and recommend ways of accelerating it on the basis of research and the best practices to be found in corporate, government and academic institutions. The participants and presenters come from large and small industries, colleges and universities, and government agancies; they also represent a cross section of the scientific world, ranging from student to Nobel laureate. The shared perspective of the conference was that increased diversity must be aided and abetted through substantive changes in the attitudes, policies and practices that inform how we educate and evaluate the workforce and how we manage the workplace.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Women in Science and Engineering collects papers, brief personal reminiscences, and remarks from a March 1998 conference sponsored by the New York Academy of Sciences and held in New York City. There is an extraordinary variety of papers, all of which address the experience of women in science and engineering with the hope of recommending ways of accelerating the progress they have made in entering and staying in these fields. Progress has been made, but women still drop out of science at rates proportionately higher than men; women do less well than men in these careers; and women report that there are still deeply internalized views of women and of science that make the two seem mutually exclusive and incompatible. This is an extremely valuable and informative set of papers; the candor and detailed knowledge of the participants provide valuable and thoughtful insight into an issue of national concern. It is of a high intellectual level but clearly written and fascinating. Highly recommended for readers in the scientific and engineering disciplines, women's studies, history of science, and sociology of science, as well as for those engaged in scientific research, industry, and engineering. All levels. M. H. Chaplin; Wellesley College


Choice Review

Women in Science and Engineering collects papers, brief personal reminiscences, and remarks from a March 1998 conference sponsored by the New York Academy of Sciences and held in New York City. There is an extraordinary variety of papers, all of which address the experience of women in science and engineering with the hope of recommending ways of accelerating the progress they have made in entering and staying in these fields. Progress has been made, but women still drop out of science at rates proportionately higher than men; women do less well than men in these careers; and women report that there are still deeply internalized views of women and of science that make the two seem mutually exclusive and incompatible. This is an extremely valuable and informative set of papers; the candor and detailed knowledge of the participants provide valuable and thoughtful insight into an issue of national concern. It is of a high intellectual level but clearly written and fascinating. Highly recommended for readers in the scientific and engineering disciplines, women's studies, history of science, and sociology of science, as well as for those engaged in scientific research, industry, and engineering. All levels. M. H. Chaplin; Wellesley College


Table of Contents

Cecily Cannan SelbyRodney W. NicholsPhyllis GoldbergGertrude B. ElionJames PrestonCarol BerczukGerhard SonnertPaula M. Rayman and Julie Pearson StewartDudley HerschbachSheila TobiasGerald HoltonNaphysah DuncanMary Frank FoxJohn DowlingSue V. RosserAnita BorgDiane Hoffman-KimStephanie D. WilsonHelen C. DaviesElaine SeymourCecily C. SelbyBarbara Gerolimatos and Marcia L. WorthingSara Lee SchupeMary Mattis and Jennifer AllynSusan C. EatonVicki L. SatoNancy J. HutsonDaryl E. ChubinBeverly Karplus HartlineCarolyn L. HuntoonCynthia FriendShenda M. BakerMary S. ErskineKarin RabeJudy FranzCecily Cannan SelbyRodney W. NicholsPhyllis GoldbergGertrude B. ElionJames PrestonCarol BerczukGerhard SonnertPaula M. Rayman and Julie Pearson StewartDudley HerschbachSheila TobiasGerald HoltonNaphysah DuncanMary Frank FoxJohn DowlingSue V. RosserAnita BorgDiane Hoffman-KimStephanie D. WilsonHelen C. DaviesElaine SeymourCecily C. SelbyBarbara Gerolimatos and Marcia L. WorthingSara Lee SchupeMary Mattis and Jennifer AllynSusan C. EatonVicki L. SatoNancy J. HutsonDaryl E. ChubinBeverly Karplus HartlineCarolyn L. HuntoonCynthia FriendShenda M. BakerMary S. ErskineKarin RabeJudy Franz
Dedicationp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction to a 25th Anniversary Conferencep. 1
Creeping Toward Inclusivity in Science: Executive Summaryp. 7
Personal Reflectionp. 16
Working Together to Expand Opportunityp. 19
Invited Background Papers
Choices and Successes: Honoring Women Pioneers. Interviewsp. 22
Women in Science and Engineering: Advances, Challenges, and Solutions. A survey of the literaturep. 34
Part I Changes: What Difference Has the Last Twenty-Five Years Made?
Reaching for Success in Science: Women's Uneven Journeyp. 58
Changes in the Gardens of Science, Wrought by Womenp. 66
Part II Choices: What Keeps Women in Science and Engineering?
Session A. The Work
Introduction and Summaryp. 75
Different Perceptions of "Good Science" and Their Effects on Careersp. 78
Where Women Are in the Majorityp. 87
Gender, Knowledge, and Scientific Stylesp. 89
Session B. The Workplace
Opening Remarksp. 94
Different Laboratory/Work Climates: Impacts on Women in the Workplacep. 95
What Draws Women to and Keeps Women in Computing?p. 102
Women Scientists in Laboratory Culture: Perspectives from an Academic Scientist in Trainingp. 106
Reflections on a Career in the Aerospace Industryp. 110
Session C. The Rewards
Oh, If They Could Only See Us Now!p. 113
The Role of Socialization in Shaping the Career-Related Choices of Undergraduate Women in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Majorsp. 118
Review and Summary of Part II Sessionsp. 127
Models of Success and Satisfaction: An Interactive, Intergenerational Discussionp. 133
Changing the Way Our Culture Interacts with Sciencep. 140
Part III Successes: Which Policies and Practices Work?
Session A. What Promotes Success in the Private Sector?
Women Scientists in Industryp. 143
Surprising Opportunities: Gender and the Structure of Work in Biotechnology Firmsp. 175
Women in Biotechnology: Finding a Placep. 189
Women Driversp. 191
Session B. What Policies of Government Agencies Are Worth Emulating?
Introductionp. 197
Promoting Success in the Department of Energyp. 200
Opening Doors for Women in Space: A Perspective from the National Aeronautics and Space Administrationp. 204
Session C. What Promotes the Development of Women Scientists in Academia?
Introductory Remarksp. 207
Academic Policies and Practices
Success for Women in Academia: Choices, Experiences, and Challengesp. 210
A View from the Trenchesp. 219
Issues of Isolation and Communityp. 224
Women as Valued Members of the Scientific Communityp. 226
Part IV The Future: What Have We Learned and How Can It Help?
A Panel Discussion with Cecily C. Selby, Eleanor Baum, Daryl E. Chubin, and Lilian Shiao-Yen Wup. 236
Conference Participantsp. 246
Index of Contributorsp. 263
Dedicationp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction to a 25th Anniversary Conferencep. 1
Creeping Toward Inclusivity in Science: Executive Summaryp. 7
Personal Reflectionp. 16
Working Together to Expand Opportunityp. 19
Invited Background Papers
Choices and Successes: Honoring Women Pioneers. Interviewsp. 22
Women in Science and Engineering: Advances, Challenges, and Solutions. A survey of the literaturep. 34
Part I Changes: What Difference Has the Last Twenty-Five Years Made?
Reaching for Success in Science: Women's Uneven Journeyp. 58
Changes in the Gardens of Science, Wrought by Womenp. 66
Part II Choices: What Keeps Women in Science and Engineering?
Session A. The Work
Introduction and Summaryp. 75
Different Perceptions of "Good Science" and Their Effects on Careersp. 78
Where Women Are in the Majorityp. 87
Gender, Knowledge, and Scientific Stylesp. 89
Session B. The Workplace
Opening Remarksp. 94
Different Laboratory/Work Climates: Impacts on Women in the Workplacep. 95
What Draws Women to and Keeps Women in Computing?p. 102
Women Scientists in Laboratory Culture: Perspectives from an Academic Scientist in Trainingp. 106
Reflections on a Career in the Aerospace Industryp. 110
Session C. The Rewards
Oh, If They Could Only See Us Now!p. 113
The Role of Socialization in Shaping the Career-Related Choices of Undergraduate Women in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Majorsp. 118
Review and Summary of Part II Sessionsp. 127
Models of Success and Satisfaction: An Interactive, Intergenerational Discussionp. 133
Changing the Way Our Culture Interacts with Sciencep. 140
Part III Successes: Which Policies and Practices Work?
Session A. What Promotes Success in the Private Sector?
Women Scientists in Industryp. 143
Surprising Opportunities: Gender and the Structure of Work in Biotechnology Firmsp. 175
Women in Biotechnology: Finding a Placep. 189
Women Driversp. 191
Session B. What Policies of Government Agencies Are Worth Emulating?
Introductionp. 197
Promoting Success in the Department of Energyp. 200
Opening Doors for Women in Space: A Perspective from the National Aeronautics and Space Administrationp. 204
Session C. What Promotes the Development of Women Scientists in Academia?
Introductory Remarksp. 207
Academic Policies and Practices
Success for Women in Academia: Choices, Experiences, and Challengesp. 210
A View from the Trenchesp. 219
Issues of Isolation and Communityp. 224
Women as Valued Members of the Scientific Communityp. 226
Part IV The Future: What Have We Learned and How Can It Help?
A Panel Discussion with Cecily C. Selby, Eleanor Baum, Daryl E. Chubin, and Lilian Shiao-Yen Wup. 236
Conference Participantsp. 246
Index of Contributorsp. 263