Cover image for Through my eyes
Title:
Through my eyes
Author:
Bridges, Ruby.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
63 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Ruby Bridges recounts the story of her involvement, as a six-year-old, in the integration of her school in New Orleans in 1960.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
860 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.9 2.0 36565.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.6 3 Quiz: 17389 Guided reading level: W.
ISBN:
9780590189231
Format :
Book

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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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F379.N59 N435 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

In November 1960, all of America watched as a tiny six-year-old black girl, surrounded by federal marshals, walked through a mob of screaming segregationists and into her school. An icon of the civil rights movement, Ruby Bridges chronicles each dramatic step of this pivotal event in history through her own words.


Author Notes

Ruby Bridges became a pioneer in school integration at the age of six, when she was chosen to spend her first-grade year in what had formerly been an all-white elementary school. Ruby Bridges now works as a lecturer, telling her story to adults and children alike. She lives with her husband and sons in New Orleans, Louisiana.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-9. Harvard psychologist Robert Coles told The Story of Ruby Bridges (1995) in a picture book for young children. Here Bridges tells her own story for older readers, combining her adult commentary, news reports of the time, and graphic personal memories of what it was like for her as a six-year-old child, the first black pupil to attend a formerly segregated school in New Orleans, in 1960. The book design is like a magazine article's, with spacious type, occasional small boxed quotes, and dramatic sepia-toned news photos, many of them full-page close-ups showing the angry, jeering demonstrators, the small girl escorted to and from the school building by her mother and the U.S. marshalls, and young Ruby with her supportive white teacher alone in the classroom. Most moving is Bridges' memory of her childhood innocence ("There were barricades and people shouting and policemen everywhere. I thought maybe it was Mardi Gras, the carnival"). She even jumped rope to the rhyme "Two, four, six, eight, we don't want to integrate." She didn't know what it all meant, until one day a little white boy refused to play with her: his mother had told him not to, he said, "because you're a nigger." Ruby was stunned to realize that "it was all about the color of my skin." This is a great book for classroom discussion and has a good deal of interest to adults: the individual child's experience, the roles of Bridges' mother and teacher, the civil rights history. Bridges speaks without heroics about what happened to her then and what it means now. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

With Robert Coles's 1995 picture book, The Story of Ruby Bridges, and a Disney television movie, readers may feel they already know all about Bridges, who in 1960 was the first black child to attend a New Orleans public elementary school. But the account she gives here is freshly riveting. With heartbreaking understatement, she gives voice to her six-year-old self. Escorted on her first day by U.S. marshals, young Ruby was met by throngs of virulent protesters ("I thought maybe it was Mardi Gras... Mardi Gras was always noisy," she remembers). Her prose stays unnervingly true to the perspective of a child: "The policeman at the door and the crowd behind us made me think this was an important place. It must be college, I thought to myself." Inside, conditions were just as strange, if not as threatening. Ruby was kept in her own classroom, receiving one-on-one instruction from teacher Barbara Henry, a recent transplant from Boston. Sidebars containing statements from Henry and Bridges's mother, or excerpts from newspaper accounts and John Steinbeck's Travels with Charley, provide information and perspectives unavailable to Bridges as a child. As the year went on, Henry accidentally discovered the presence of other first graders, and she had to force the principal to send them into her classroom for part of the day (the principal refused to make the other white teachers educate a black child). Ironically, it was only when one of these children refused to play with Ruby ("My mama said not to because you're a nigger") that Ruby realized that "everything had happened because I was black.... It was all about the color of my skin." Sepia-toned period photographs join the sidebars in rounding out Bridges's account. But Bridges's words, recalling a child's innocence and trust, are more vivid than even the best of the photos. Like poetry or prayer, they melt the heart. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Profusely illustrated with sepia photos-including many gritty journalistic reproductions-this memoir brings some of the raw emotions of a tumultuous period into sharp focus. In her recounting of the events of 1960-61, the year she became the first African-American child to integrate the William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, Bridges is true to her childhood memories. She is clear about what she remembers and what she later learned. Her account is accompanied by excerpts from newspaper articles, comments by her teacher, and a time line that fill in the details and place her story within the context of the Civil Rights Movement. The narrative draws a distinct contrast between the innocence of this six-year-old child who thought that "Two, four, six, eight, we don't want to integrate" was a jump-rope chant and the jeers of the angry crowd outside her school carrying a black doll in a coffin. A powerful personal narrative that every collection will want to own.-Daryl Grabarek, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4 Up-At age six, Ruby Bridges became the first African American student to attend an all-white school in New Orleans. In addition to her childhood memories, she shares her adult perceptions of the role she played in the Civil Rights Movement. Compelling sepia-toned photographs enhance this personal narrative. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.