Cover image for Charter schools : another flawed educational reform?
Title:
Charter schools : another flawed educational reform?
Author:
Sarason, Seymour Bernard, 1919-2010.
Publication Information:
New York : Teachers College Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
viii, 115 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780807737859

9780807737842
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library LB2806.36 .S27 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The majority of states have charter school legislation, but too many charter schools could fail unless school reformers consider the pitfalls in creating new settings. This text provides a conceptual road map for educators and legislators to prepare and overcome predictable problems.


Summary

The majority of states have charter school legislation, but too many charter schools could fail unless school reformers consider the pitfalls in creating new settings. This text provides a conceptual road map for educators and legislators to prepare and overcome predictable problems.


Author Notes

Seymour B. Sarason is Professor of Psychology Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and at the Institution for Social and Policy Analysis at Yale University. His previously published work includes How Schools Might Be Governed and Why (1997), Revisiting The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change (1996), and School Change: The Personal Development of a Point of View (1995).


Reviews 2

Choice Review

It is very clear from the outset that Sarason (emeritus, psychology, Yale) is pessimistic about the success of charter schools in the United States. He notes how little empirical data exists that substantiates the charter movement's achievements and failures. As Sarason points out, his earlier volume The Creation of Settings and the Future Societies (1972) continues to be much of the rationale for his conclusions. The current volume contains 11 chapters that give an overview and background of historical and personal perspectives about charter schools. Chapters 5 through 7 look squarely at how organizations function, how a charter school can develop, and who are the real stakeholders of a charter school. Relevance is the key concept carried through most of the volume's discussion. The author, however, admits that he wrote this book to express his beliefs concerning the "creation of settings." Sarason's ever present question, "why do so many new settings in education fall so short of the mark or are total failures?" is a constant reiteration of his desire for a firm "conceptual map" for the change process. This is a thoughtful rationale for any volume. Recommended for general readers, upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and practitioners. R. C. Morris; State University of West Georgia


Choice Review

It is very clear from the outset that Sarason (emeritus, psychology, Yale) is pessimistic about the success of charter schools in the United States. He notes how little empirical data exists that substantiates the charter movement's achievements and failures. As Sarason points out, his earlier volume The Creation of Settings and the Future Societies (1972) continues to be much of the rationale for his conclusions. The current volume contains 11 chapters that give an overview and background of historical and personal perspectives about charter schools. Chapters 5 through 7 look squarely at how organizations function, how a charter school can develop, and who are the real stakeholders of a charter school. Relevance is the key concept carried through most of the volume's discussion. The author, however, admits that he wrote this book to express his beliefs concerning the "creation of settings." Sarason's ever present question, "why do so many new settings in education fall so short of the mark or are total failures?" is a constant reiteration of his desire for a firm "conceptual map" for the change process. This is a thoughtful rationale for any volume. Recommended for general readers, upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and practitioners. R. C. Morris; State University of West Georgia


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