Cover image for First day, hooray!
Title:
First day, hooray!
Author:
Poydar, Nancy.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
All over town, Ivy Green and her bus driver and her teacher and the other school employees get ready for the first day of school.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 160 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.7 0.5 36639.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 25346 Guided reading level: K.
ISBN:
9780823414376
Format :
Book

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Central Library J PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eden Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Orchard Park Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Williamsville Library PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Audubon Library J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Brand-new shoes, her very own lunchbox, and just the thought of a whole room filled with kids! No wonder Ivy Green can't wait for school to start tomorrow. But she is also a little worried. What if she misses the bus? How will she find Ms. Bell's room?Although she doesn't know it, Ivy isn't the only one who is nervous. Miss Wheeler, the bus driver; Mr. Handy, the custodian; Ms. Bell, her teacher; and even Mr. Masters, the principal, are all scrambling to prepare for the big day. Will they all be ready in time?Nancy Poydar's exuberant paintings and reassuring story capture the anticipation, the apprehensions, and the excitement of the first day of school.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-6. Ivy Green is worried about her upcoming first day of school. Will the bus driver wait for her? What if she forgets her lunch? What if she can't find her classroom? With buoyant, colorful illustrations and rhythmic, cheerful prose, Poydar allays those first-day jitters. Yes, Ivy's parents are understanding and warm, but what children will find particularly reassuring here is the idea that they are not the only ones with apprehensions: the bus driver, the custodian, Ivy's teacher, and the school principal are all shown hard at work on last-minute concerns. Poydar also shows them at home in the evening, doing homey things, and at night, getting ready for bed--real people with real lives and anxious dreams (the principal dreams he arrives at school in his pajamas). When morning comes, everyone is ready for the long-awaited day. Hooray! A good companion to Amy Hest's Off to School, Baby Duck! [BKL Se 15 99]. --Tim Arnold


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-A satisfying exploration of the anxiety and joy experienced before and during the first day of school. The focus is not just on young Ivy Green but on the bus driver, janitor, teacher, and principal of her school. On the day before school starts, each one is shown getting ready-buying shoes, going over the bus route, polishing floors, or making name tags. The book artfully moves on to night-before jitters and pre-bed activities, followed by a segment of nerve-induced dreams. Mr. Masters, the principal, has a "pajamas-on dream," while Ivy moves from a "no-lunch dream" to a "which-door dream." Then, with the crack of dawn, the sun beams down on a day in which everything is as it should be. The clever text flows naturally from child to adult experiences, from morning to night, and from excited energy to reflection. As such, it is wonderfully balanced, made even more successful by the complementary illustrations, which are soft and friendly. The animated cartoon characters are brought to life while the town, with houses built almost on top of each other, is clearly a close-knit community. One challenge to this book is that ideas are often oblique rather than obvious, and children will need to use visual and textual clues to figure out the events and characters. How refreshing!-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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