Cover image for Candy corn : poems
Title:
Candy corn : poems
Author:
Stevenson, James, 1929-2017.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
55 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 21 cm
Summary:
A collection of short poems with titles such as "The Morning After Halloween, " "Dumpsters, " and "What Frogs Say To Each Other."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.7 2 Quiz: 29579 Guided reading level: P.
ISBN:
9780688158378
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Newstead Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Marilla Free Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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North Collins Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library PS3569.T4557 C36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Give yourself a treat. Open this book. Smile!An ALA Notable BookGive yourself a treat.Open this book.Smile!In these twenty-four subtly powerful poems (including a memorable ode to eating peanuts), James Stevenson transforms the ordinary into the extraordinary. This new collection, the third in a series, features the cohesive blend of sharp insights and signature drawings that Stevenson's fans have come to expect. Readers who don't know they care about such seemingly mundane things as bare feet, auto parts, and buses at night will be convinced otherwise after a few servings of "Candy Corn" ... Funny, sad, wry, moving poetry for all ages. 2000 Notable Children's Books (ALA)


Author Notes

James Stevenson was born in Manhattan, New York on July 11, 1929. He graduated from Yale University. He was a reporter from Life magazine before being hired by The New Yorker in 1956. He drew 1,988 cartoons, 79 covers, and wrote and illustrated articles including Talk of the Town pieces for the magazine. He also drew editorial cartoons for The New York Times and in 2004 began an occasional series for the Op-Ed page entitled Lost and Found New York, which looked back on people and places of the past.

He wrote and/or illustrated more than 100 children's books including Don't You Know There's a War On, The Worst Person in the World, Higher on the Door, The Mud Flat Olympics, Yard Sale, The Mud Flat Mystery, What's Under My Bed, That Terrible Halloween Night, and Worse Than Willy. In 1987, he won the Caldecott Honor for When I Was Nine. He also wrote novels and an illustrated biography of Frank Modell, a fellow New Yorker cartoonist. He died of pneumonia on February 17, 2017 at the age of 87.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5, younger for reading aloud. As in Popcorn, a Booklist 1998 Editors' Choice, Stevenson's images range from junkyard jumble to fragile blossoms. With minute particulars of ordinary life, his casual words and wonderful, scribbly ink-and-watercolor pictures work together to make you feel love and longing, mystery and wonder; turn the page, and you laugh out loud with wry recognition. OK, so most kids won't know Robert Frost, but they will get the picture of "Stone Wall" ("All those different rocks / Working together"), just as they will recognize how the screech and slam of a screen door can mean someone you love is either coming or going ("But what a difference it makes to me / your going away / your coming home"). With such simplicity, there is always risk, and a few pieces are flat, but the best of them open out to change the way you see things around you. "Friendly" is about spring, when lilacs bend in the soft air, and even the beech tree sends a branch to pay a visit to your porch. Then there is the amazing intricacy of the paving machine that sits in the dirt, the picture a hilarious jumble of tubes and machinery, "part tank, part spaghetti." Children will see that even the dumpsters that take the worst of everything have a life, and that in a meadow of daisies, one daisy is a miracle. (Reviewed March 15, 1999)0688158374Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-6-Like the sweet candy corn people nibble every autumn, these poems are delectable tidbits that tickle the taste buds. Stevenson's third collection of poignant, brief poems is both satisfying and illuminating. Once again, layout, text, color, line, and verse combine to produce a delightful array of treats. The 24 poems offer a new view of such diverse topics as peanuts, frogs, dumpsters, and dawn. Who but this master of succinct wordplay and pictures could see candy corn as dragon's teeth, imagine school buses chatting at the end of the day, or find 11 ways to express bird noises? Each selection is exquisitely illustrated in pastel watercolor and black ink; colored pages add interest to several verses and tinted ink highlights others. This gem belongs alongside Sweet Corn (1995) and Popcorn (1998, both Greenwillow) in every library.-Beth Tegart, Oneida City Schools, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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