Cover image for The interior
Title:
The interior
Author:
See, Lisa.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
391 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060192617
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

From the teeming streets of Beijing to the mean streets of Los Angeles to a Chinese village that seems almost lost in time, Chinese police detective Liu Hulan goes undercover in an enthralling sequel to the bestselling "Flower Net."


Author Notes

Lisa See was born in Paris but grew up in Los Angeles, spending much of her time in Chinatown. She is of Chinese decent. Her first book, On Gold Mountain: The One Hundred Year Odyssey of My Chinese-American Family (1995), was a national bestseller and a New York Times Notable Book. The book traces the journey of Lisa's great-grandfather, Fong See. Her first fiction novel, Flower Net (1997) was a national bestseller, a New York Times Notable Book, and on the Los Angeles Times Best Books List for 1997. Flower Net was also nominated for an Edgar award for best first novel.

In addition to writing books, Ms. See was the Publishers Weekly West Coast Correspondent for 13 years. Her bestselling novels, all inspired by her Chinese heritage, include Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, A Peony in Love, Shanghi Girls, Dreams of Joy and China Dolls. Among her awards and recognitions are the Organization of Chinese Americans Women's 2001 award as National Woman of the Year and the 2003 History Makers Award presented by the Chinese American Museum. See serves as a Los Angeles City Commissioner.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Female police detective Liu Hulan travels from Beijing to Da Shui to aid an old friend, Ling Suchee, whose daughter has died. Suchee believes her daughter, who worked at an American toy factory, was murdered. As Hulan goes undercover in the factory, she soon learns how women there are treated like slaves--and possibly murdered. In a strange coincidence, Hulan's American boyfriend, attorney David Stark, comes to China to help negotiate the sale of the toy factory to a huge conglomerate. How Hulan, David, and Suchee join forces is exciting and interesting, but the novel does, at times, seem long and wordy, due to the digressions of an annoying omniscient narrator. What ultimately redeems this thriller is the unflinching portrait it paints of modern-day China. --Jenny McLarin


Publisher's Weekly Review

As in her debut novel, Flower Net, the strength of See's work here is in her detailed and intimate knowledge of contemporary China, its mores, its peculiar mixture of the traditional and the contemporary, and its often bedeviled relationships with the U.S. Here again are American lawyer David Stark and his Chinese lover, police investigator Liu Hulan; they become involved in the issue of working conditions among women in an American-owned toy factory in rural ChinaÄa highly promising and original notion. Stark's law firm wants him to supervise the buyout of the American entrepreneur who launched the toy company, while Liu is called in by the mother of a factory worker who seems to have committed suicide. What actually happened to her, and why? It seems inevitable that the lovers will be pulled in different directions by their opposing interests, and soon Liu has introduced herself into the factory as a worker, while Stark's deal, important to his career, begins to unravel. So far, so good; but as the action becomes increasingly violent, with another girl's sudden death at the factory, gunplay, a deathly sick Liu struggling to survive, and a climactic fire that takes hundreds of lives (a calamity treated almost as an afterthought), it becomes apparent that See has plotting problems. Many story threads seem to disappear, the action scenes are stagy and unconvincing, and the David-Liu relationship never seems to generate much real warmth. A pity, because until the melodrama takes over, much here is original and fresh, an absorbing look at an unfamiliar world. Agent, Sandra Dijkstra. 6-city author tour. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved