Cover image for Words fail me : what everyone who writes should know about writing
Title:
Words fail me : what everyone who writes should know about writing
Author:
O'Conner, Patricia T.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Harcourt Brace, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
x, 230 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
930 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780151003716
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN147 .O27 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library PN147 .O27 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

And not a minute too soon! Armed with our laptops and our PCs, we're the writing-est generation ever, cranking out e-mail, Web pages, electronic bulletin board postings, not to mention office memos, faxes, reports, newsletters, school papers, even memoirs and novels. But many of us were never taught how to write a sentence that makes sense, how to make sure our words do justice to our ideas. The result? Never have so many written so much so badly. Patricia T. O'Conner comes to the rescue with Words Fail Me, a practical and witty guide to the elements of good writing. She takes you through the writing process step by step. Pat O'Conner has done it again. So, there'll be no more staring blankly at an empty screen. Words Fail Me will charm the good writer out of you.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

This book is for beginning writers--those who want to write or need to write but find that the words get in the way. Those words may include misplaced modifiers, passive verbs, and split infinitives, among others. Students writing papers, employees preparing reports, and those who just want to be understood in print may benefit from this fun-to-use answer to Strunk and White. O'Connor uses humor as she takes apart sentences and their parts and shows how each element is used effectively. She does get into the heavy-duty writing tools and even the pitfalls, including point of view, jargon, and rhythm. --Marlene Chamberlain


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