Cover image for A doctor to her people : Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte
Title:
A doctor to her people : Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte
Author:
Wilkerson, J. L.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Kansas City, MO : Acorn Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
vi, 99 pages : illustrations, maps ; 20 cm.
Summary:
A biography of the Omaha Indian woman who became the first Native American woman to graduate from medical school.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780966447026
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Newstead Library E99.O4 P539 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Kenmore Library E99.O4 P539 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

A biography of the Omaha Indian woman who became the first Native American woman to graduate from medical school.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. Susan LaFlesche was born in 1865; her father, Iron Eye, was called Joseph LaFlesche by his white father's family. The chief of the Omaha, Iron Eye tried to reconcile tribal ways with those of the white U.S. He sent all his children to white people's schools but had difficulty blending traditional Omaha family ties with Susan's desire to study medicine. Susan and several of her siblings studied at the famed Hampton Institute, and she studied medicine at the Woman's Medical College of Philadelphia, becoming the first female Native American doctor. She served her people as both healer and advisor her whole life. This biography, with its maps, drawings, and photographs packs a fair amount of information into its 100 pages. The narrative isn't quite smooth, though, as we learn only midstream that Iron Eye had a wooden leg, the lack of detail about Susan's marriage is surprising, the beginning scene is overlong but the end of Susan's life seems rushed, and her selflessness seems too good to be true. There's no bibliography or list of sources. Still, young people who may never have heard of her will be fascinated. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Susan LaFlesche Picotte, the daughter of a half-white fur trapper and head chief of the Omaha and One Woman (Mary Gale), graduated from Hampton Institute and Woman's Medical College in Philadelphia in 1889 to become the first Native American woman doctor. Throughout this story of her life, the influence of her parents, particularly her father, is evident. He was committed to teaching his people the ways of the white man: "He believed passionately that the Indian way of life was rapidly passing into history." (An author's note explains the decision to use the terms "white" and "Indian" in the biography.) LaFlesche continued and expanded on his work, serving the Omaha not only as a doctor but also as an advisor and spokesperson on Native American rights. This is not a completely satisfying biography. Coverage is uneven, and sources are not given. The tone is laudatory-so much so that LaFlesche's behavior and actions seem almost too good to be believed. Captioned photographs, maps, and drawings (some of which are credited) add interest. However, the lack of documentation limits the book's usefulness for those seeking authentic biographies for research purposes.-Carolyn Angus, The Claremont Graduate School, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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