Cover image for Achieving the impossible dream : how Japanese Americans obtained redress
Title:
Achieving the impossible dream : how Japanese Americans obtained redress
Author:
Maki, Mitchell T. (Mitchell Takeshi)
Publication Information:
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xvii, 309 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Theoretical perspectives -- Historical factors prior to World War II -- World War II (1941-45) -- The postwar decades (1945-69) -- The genesis of the modern redress movement (1970-78) -- The commission on wartime relocation and internment of civilians (1979-82) -- Other efforts at redress -- The continuing legislative battle (1983-86) -- The aligning of the One-hundredth Congress (1987-88) -- The President's signature and the fight for appropriations -- Delivering on the promise -- Lessons of a movement.
ISBN:
9780252024580

9780252067648
Format :
Book

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Call Number
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Status
Central Library D769.8.A6 M29 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Nearly fifty years after being incarcerated by their own government, Japanese American concentration camp survivors succeeded in obtaining redress for the personal humiliation, family dislocation, and economic ruin caused by their ordeal. An inspiring story of wrongs made right, as well as a practical guide to getting legislation through Congress, Achieving the Impossible Dream tells how members of this politically inexperienced minority group organized themselves at the grass-roots level, gathered political support, and succeeded in obtaining a written apology from the president of the United States and monetary compensation in accordance with the provisions of the 1988 Civil Liberties Act.


Summary

Nearly fifty years after being incarcerated by their own government, Japanese American concentration camp survivors succeeded in obtaining redress for the personal humiliation, family dislocation, and economic ruin caused by their ordeal. An inspiring story of wrongs made right as well as a practical guide to getting legislation through Congress, Achieving the Impossible Dream tells how members of this politically inexperienced minority group organized themselves at the grass-roots level, gathered political support, and succeeded in obtaining a written apology from the president of the United States and monetary compensation in accordance with the provisions of the 1988 Civil Liberties Act.


Author Notes

Mitchell T. Maki is an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy at the University of California at Los Angeles.
Harry H. L. Kitano is professor emeritus of social welfare and sociology at UCLA.
S. Megan Berthold is a senior researcher at the Center for Language Minority Education and Research at California State University, Long Beach.


Mitchell T. Maki is an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy at the University of California at Los Angeles.
Harry H. L. Kitano is professor emeritus of social welfare and sociology at UCLA.
S. Megan Berthold is a senior researcher at the Center for Language Minority Education and Research at California State University, Long Beach.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

In 1942 the US imprisoned more than 110,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps without due process. Racist hysteria and false claims of military necessity contributed to that violation of basic constitutional rights. Maki, Kitano, and Berthold examine the roles played by Japanese American civic organizations, political activists, members of Congress, the courts, and changing public opinion in the struggle to obtain an official apology and financial compensation for this injustice. Beginning in the 1970s the Japanese American community increasingly rallied behind the cause of redress. In 1988, after an uphill battle, legislation apologizing for the internment and authorizing payments of $20,000 to surviving internees was finally signed into law. It was still necessary to obtain appropriations and determine precisely who was eligible for compensation. In the end, more than 82,000 individuals were granted compensation. This is a useful case study of a successful national lobbying effort. The authors conducted many illuminating interviews and show a good grasp of the published literature. Their book is a good alternative or supplement to Leslie Hatamiya's Righting a Wrong (CH, Mar'94), which covers much of the same ground. Upper-division undergraduates and above. L. Maley III; University of Massachusetts at Amherst


Choice Review

In 1942 the US imprisoned more than 110,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps without due process. Racist hysteria and false claims of military necessity contributed to that violation of basic constitutional rights. Maki, Kitano, and Berthold examine the roles played by Japanese American civic organizations, political activists, members of Congress, the courts, and changing public opinion in the struggle to obtain an official apology and financial compensation for this injustice. Beginning in the 1970s the Japanese American community increasingly rallied behind the cause of redress. In 1988, after an uphill battle, legislation apologizing for the internment and authorizing payments of $20,000 to surviving internees was finally signed into law. It was still necessary to obtain appropriations and determine precisely who was eligible for compensation. In the end, more than 82,000 individuals were granted compensation. This is a useful case study of a successful national lobbying effort. The authors conducted many illuminating interviews and show a good grasp of the published literature. Their book is a good alternative or supplement to Leslie Hatamiya's Righting a Wrong (CH, Mar'94), which covers much of the same ground. Upper-division undergraduates and above. L. Maley III; University of Massachusetts at Amherst


Table of Contents

Representative Robert T. MatsuiRoger DanielsRepresentative Robert T. MatsuiRoger Daniels
Forewordp. ix
Forewordp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
1. Theoretical Perspectivesp. 9
2. Historical Factors prior to World War IIp. 20
3. World War II (1941-45)p. 33
4. The Postwar Decades (1945-69)p. 51
5. The Genesis of the Modern Redress Movement (1970-78)p. 64
6. The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (1979-82)p. 85
7. Other Efforts at Redressp. 117
8. The Continuing Legislative Battle (1983-86)p. 137
9. The Aligning of the One-hundredth Congress (1987-88)p. 161
10. The President's Signature and the Fight for Appropriationsp. 189
11. Delivering on the Promisep. 213
12. Lessons of a Movementp. 228
Notesp. 243
Works Citedp. 279
Indexp. 291
Forewordp. ix
Forewordp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
1. Theoretical Perspectivesp. 9
2. Historical Factors prior to World War IIp. 20
3. World War II (1941-45)p. 33
4. The Postwar Decades (1945-69)p. 51
5. The Genesis of the Modern Redress Movement (1970-78)p. 64
6. The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (1979-82)p. 85
7. Other Efforts at Redressp. 117
8. The Continuing Legislative Battle (1983-86)p. 137
9. The Aligning of the One-hundredth Congress (1987-88)p. 161
10. The President's Signature and the Fight for Appropriationsp. 189
11. Delivering on the Promisep. 213
12. Lessons of a Movementp. 228
Notesp. 243
Works Citedp. 279
Indexp. 291

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