Cover image for Don't be my valentine
Title:
Don't be my valentine
Author:
Lexau, Joan M.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Newly illustrated edition.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins Publishers, 1999.
Physical Description:
64 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Summary:
Sam's mean valentine for Amy Lou goes astray at school and almost ruins the day for him and his friends.
General Note:
"A Classrrom mystery".
Language:
English
Reading Level:
190 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 30617.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.6 2 Quiz: 20855 Guided reading level: J.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060282400

9780060282394

9780064442541
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library READER Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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Clarence Library READER Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Clarence Library READER Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Clarence Library READER Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"Don't bug me, Amy Lou!" Amy Lou is always trying to help Sam, and it bothers him. So when it's time for valentines, Sam makes a mean one for her. But the valentine is delivered to Sam's teacher instead of Amy Lou. How did that happen? Its a Valentines Day mystery! Sam is tired of Amy Lou bugging him all the time so he sends her an especially mean valentine. But when the valentines are delivered, Amy Lou gets a nice one from Sam and its their teacher who receives the mean valentine. How did that happen? Joan Lexaus funny story and Syd Hoffs heartwarming illustrations, available for the first time in full-color, are sure to have beginning readers laughing as they try to figure out who pulled the valentine switch. School Library Journal said about DONT BE MY VALENTINE A funny, realistic school story, this will also be a holiday hit.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 1-2. Amy Lou keeps "helping" Sam, much to his annoyance. So when Valentine's Day comes around, Sam sends a Valentine to Amy Lou that's not so nice. But instead of it winding up in Amy Lou's pile, the teacher gets it. That's the mildly interesting mystery of the subtitle. It's a little difficult to follow some of the dialogue; sentences are divided on two or three lines and seem jerky. Nevertheless, Valentine's Day is always a welcome subject for younger readers. Equally welcome is the fact that Sam and Amy Lou are African Americans; black characters are not usually featured in easy readers. Hoff's lively color illustrations boost the text. (Reviewed March 15, 1999)0060282398Ilene Cooper


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