Cover image for The pig who ran a red light
Title:
The pig who ran a red light
Author:
Johnson, Paul Brett.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Orchard Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
After her pig George gets a ticket while driving her pick-up truck, Miss Rosemary uses his habit of imitating Gertrude the cow to get him to behave as he should.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
310 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 68453.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.8 1 Quiz: 23522 Guided reading level: M.
ISBN:
9780531301364

9780531331361
Format :
Book

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Hamburg Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenilworth Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lake Shore Library PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

After her pig George gets a ticket while driving her pick-up truck, Miss Rosemary uses his habit of imitating Gertrude the cow to get him to behave as he should.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-7. Miss Rosemary's pig, George, has taken to mimicking the antics of Gertrude the cow, causing considerable problems. But Miss Rosemary has a plan. She has a long talk with Gertrude, who suddenly begins acting like a pig, oinking, snorting, and even wallowing happily in the mud. George is puzzled at first, but soon he is wallowing like an old pro. Miss Rosemary is quite pleased with herself--until Magnolia the goose begins oinking. Johnson's animated illustrations are wonderfully expressive and filled with zany animal antics, making them a perfect complement to the slapstick humor of the story. Some youngsters will remember Gertrude from Johnson's wacky, well-received debut The Cow Who Wouldn't Come Down (1993), which can be paired with this book for a fun-filled story time. --Lauren Peterson


Publisher's Weekly Review

This be-yourself tall tale shows how a barnyard animal resolves his identity crisis. Impressionistic illustrations, composed of multicolored squiggles and daubs of watercolor, set the scene at a sun-dappled farmhouse with leafy summertime trees and purple hills in the distance. Here lives George the pig, a friend of Gertrude the flying cow, star of Johnson's The Cow Who Wouldn't Come Down. Gertrude effortlessly soars through the air, plays the piano and drives a tractor. George's attempts to do likewise meet with less success, as the title indicates. Grandmotherly Miss Rosemary, the farm's spry, white-haired overseer, tries to discourage George ("Just because Gertrude is a silly nincompoop, doesn't mean you have to be one too") and finally has a "long talk" with the gambolling cow. The next day, Gertrude snorts and wallows in the mud, showing George how much fun it is to be a pig. Johnson, who styles the characters as a close-knit family, restores George's piggishness. Yet the author doesn't question Gertrude's mixed message√Ąbeing bovine isn't good enough for her. The cow prodigy does as she wishes, which will likely strike a chord of recognition for those who live in the shadow of accomplished older siblings. Nevertheless, Johnson tries to suggest that the pig has enviable qualities, too, and humorously concludes the book with a goose aping George by practicing her "oink, oink." Ages 4-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Johnson, who regaled readers with The Cow Who Wouldn't Come Down (Orchard, 1993), returns with a sequel that is equally hilarious. "Ever since Gertrude [the cow] had taken up flying, there had been no living with George [the pig]," this story begins. It seems George is determined to do all the things Gertrude does, such as taking to the skies, driving Miss Rosemary's farm truck, and playing the piano-all with disastrous results. Miss Rosemary decides something has to be done, and she and Gertrude have a long talk. Soon, Gertrude is acting like a pig-rooting in the ground, squealing "Oink, Oink," and wallowing in the mud. At first puzzled, George finally gives a giant "Weeeeeeeeeeeee" and, in a lavish double-page spread, dives into the mud. Relieved, Miss Rosemary says, "Cows are cows, and pigs are pigs...And that's a known fact." But the last page hints at something more as Magnolia the duck, who has been an interested bystander throughout the fray, stands tall, wings out, and declares "OINK, OINK." The story's silliness will delight children, who will find the animals' antics downright funny, while a subtler level of humor will appeal to a slightly older crowd. Watercolor illustrations have an appropriate down-home look, while the characters' well-executed expressions and postures bring life to this affable tale.-Barbara Elleman, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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