Cover image for Garden ornaments : a stylish guide to decorating your garden
Title:
Garden ornaments : a stylish guide to decorating your garden
Author:
Baker, Martha.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Clarkson Potter, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
208 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780609602645
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library SB473.5 .B34 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

A simple bench or a charming birdbath, a graceful trellis or a weathered fountain--the right ornament in the right place can transform any garden into a lush, private Eden. Whether you have a classic suburban backyard, a small country garden, or a high-rise terrace with a city view,Garden Ornamentsshows you how to select and position the perfect furniture and ornaments for any garden.          Renowned gardener Martha Baker looks at a variety of beautiful gardens, accompanied by detail shots of furniture and ornaments, and supplies inventive but practical design tips and how-to projects, such as building a trellis or antiquing an urn. Each chapter focuses on a popular garden style--Classical, Waterside, Urban, Romantic, Rustic, Gallery, or Whimsical--and spotlights key pieces that help create these wonderful spaces. Opening up a new world of design options, Martha Baker guides you in choosing the right furniture and ornaments for your own garden--from such simple objects as urns, folding bistro chairs, or candle lanterns to more exuberant gestures like a steel topiary, a wrought-iron chandelier, or a trellis strung with lights. And to further aid you in selecting the perfect pieces, an extensive resource section not only lists garden centers, stores, and outlets, but also showcases the best garden ornaments available--bringing your own Eden closer to home.          With hundreds of gorgeous photographs by Martha's husband, Chuck Baker, and a wealth of useful information and how-to advice,Garden Ornamentsis a boundless source of inspiration, sure to delight and instruct any gardener.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Introduction When I was nine years old, I dug up a patch of my mom's backyard to plant four-o'clocks, sweet peas, and zinnias--and I've been in love with the miracle of growing things ever since. Eventually, my pleasure in the planting, nurturing, and harvesting of gardens widened to include the creative satisfaction of designing them as well. It was a compelling subject that I was to study in earnest at college and as a postgraduate student and, later, to supplement through my travels in France, England, India, and other destinations nearer to home. Over the years, I've developed a philosophy about garden design, which is that a garden should intimately reflect the lines and character of a home and, in fact, become an extension of it. The garden is an outdoor room whose components (plant materials as well as garden structures) should be handled in the same way as the corresponding decorative elements of an interior space--that is, to create a specific mood or style that is functional and aesthetically pleasing. Basically, that's what this book is meant to help you do. Here and in the following chapters, you'll learn how to choose from a variety of ornaments, such as paving, fencing, furniture, urns, pergolas, statuary, and fountains, and discover how to utilize them in ways that will best define and enhance your own personal vision of the ideal garden. Admittedly, this "garden as room" idea didn't originate with us. Rather, it seems to have sprung from an innate, universal attitude about gardens that was evident as far back as the third millennium b.c. when the Egyptians, and other horticultural enthusiasts throughout the ancient world, began planting gardens within the walled enclosures surrounding their homes. Those enclosures--whether walls of stone or brick, or marble colonnades, or rows of trees or shrubs--had a special significance. Not only did they define the space within; in effect, they also laid claim to it. It was as if early civilized human beings were reserving for themselves one small share of the outdoors where, in an uncertain, often turbulent world, they could impose a sense of order and create an oasis of peace and beauty. When you think about it, that describes the goal of almost anyone who's ever planted a garden. After establishing the perimeters of their outdoor space, old-world gardeners did what we today would instinctively do with any empty room--they furnished it with suitable materials. They laid down "flooring" and pathways that would be pleasant to walk on and look at. They planted flowers for pattern, color, and texture. They might have installed benches to rest upon, maybe an arbor for shade, and a pool or a fountain to cool the air and calm the spirit. For further interest and pleasure, they may have added statuary, urns, a bridge, or an ornamental arch--all placed with as much care and deliberation as they would have used when decorating the rooms in a house. Throughout history, changing fashions in garden design have included the Middle Eastern pleasure garden, with its colorful tiles and plashing fountains; the small Japanese contemplative garden (especially popular in cities where space is limited and the need for serenity especially acute); the lovely, grid-pathed monastery garden; the French parterre, as exemplified by the geometric formality of the gardens at Versailles and, in a smaller, more homespun version, at the Governor's Palace garden in Colonial Williamsburg; the neoclassical romantic garden, with its draping vines and "ruined" statuary; and the English estate garden, where landscape architects such as Capability Brown improved on nature by carving out huge vistas strewn with bridges, statuary, pavilions, and follies. To one degree or another, all of these styles have influenced contemporary garden design. In this book, you'll see variations of these and other classic examples, as well as garden styles unique to modern times. More importantly, you'll learn how to appreciate the basic elements of each in order to re-create whatever style you happen to favor. Since my first backyard flower patch, not a summer has gone by without a garden of some sort in my life. I suppose my design philosophy was growing steadily with every garden I ever planned and planted. But the most exciting opportunity for putting it to the test was the seaside garden my family and I created for our getaway house in Shelter Island, New York. The house itself, a three-story l920s stucco, was a total wreck when my husband, Chuck, and I bought it in l991. But, situated as it was right on the water, it seemed irresistible to our boat-loving family of two adults, four children, and a large dog. Realizing that it would take years to make all the improvements we had in mind, we made our top priority simply getting our new home into move-in shape. That done, we proceeded on the theory that something attractive was needed to distract the eye from our much-loved wreck of a house, so we got right to work on creating a garden. I'd always wanted a seaside garden. What I had in mind was a French potager, or kitchen garden, with a comingled profusion of flowers and vegetables, plus a few ornamental touches of my own, seen against an ever-changing backdrop of sky and water. After clearing the site, laying the old-brick pathways, and installing a boundary fence, plant materials, and a variety of garden ornaments, my seaside garden finally became a reality that now looks as colonial and countrified as I first envisioned it. At the beginning of the project, people told me I'd never be able to grow anything so close to the water. But somehow, despite the salt air, occasional flooding by seawater and storms, and other adverse conditions--or possibly because of them--the garden positively thrives. One reason for its success is the plants themselves. I was careful to select hardy types of flowers and vegetables and to add organic ingredients such as peat moss and fish emulsion to keep the plants fed and happy. Excerpted from Garden Ornaments: A Stylish Guide to Decorating Your Garden by Martha Baker, Chuck Baker All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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