Cover image for The house of memory : stories by Jewish women writers of Latin America
Title:
The house of memory : stories by Jewish women writers of Latin America
Author:
Agosín, Marjorie.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 1999.
Physical Description:
ix, 246 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781558612082

9781558612099
Format :
Book

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PQ7087.E5 H68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Stories that reflect influences that range from the folk stories of Eastern Europe to the Magic Realist fiction of Latin America to the testimonio of Latin American women writers.


Summary

For the first time, the work of contemporary Jewish women writers from throughout Latin America is gathered together in one captivating collection. These twenty-two stories are by such internationally acclaimed writers as Brazilian Clarice Lispector and Mexican Margo Glantz, along with many writers here introduced to English-speaking readers.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

The Latin American Jewish characters in this fierce collection of 22 stories are all asking the same question: Who am I? To the Christians of Latin America, they are outsiders, essentially classless people who at best should be ignored and at worst reviled. Jews settled in Latin America because of pogroms and wars over the centuries, and these tales have been written by the daughters and granddaughters of those immigrants. Their stories take place all over the Latin American mapÄin Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Mexico, Cuba, Chile and Costa RicaÄreflecting the heterogeneity of the Americas as well as the unique perspectives of the storytellers. The protagonist of "Gotlib, Bombero," by Barbara Mujica recalls his father's escape from Germany as he wrestles with his position in Chilean society, wondering if the local volunteer fire department will allow him to join. In Ana Vasquez's "The Sign of the Star," El¡as, a Chilean schoolboy, faces the agony of isolation and hatred as his religion sets him apart from his Catholic and Protestant classmates. El¡as is violently reminded of his difference, and his struggle and self-reflection ultimately lead him to a poignant and brave redefinition and re-creation of his complex identity. Composed in an innovative narrative style, Mexican writer Margo Glantz's entertaining story-memoir describes how she transforms herself from the daughter of poor Russian immigrants to a "well-heeled" woman simply by purchasing an expensive pair of designer shoes. A range of influences, from Isaac Bashevis Singer's folklorish tales to the Latin American traditions of magical realism, attest to the writers' geographical and ethnic backgrounds. But the power of memory and regeneration is the root of this story tree, as is the writers' determination to bear witness and lay claim to their heritage. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This unique anthology unites the voices of Jewish women writers of Latin America for the first time. In the 22 stories collected here, authors from Mexico, Argentina, Costa Rica, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Venezuela, and Cuba tell of their respective cultures and heritages. While once they spoke Yiddish, Polish, Russian, Hebrew, or Ladino, these women now speak Spanish and Portuguese. Their stories focus mainly on the memory and identity of the worlds and countries they have left. In an excerpt from The Family Tree, for instance, Mexican writer Margo Glantz fleshes out the family past in Ukraine and considers the fate of the agricultural communities set up by the tsar for the Jews. Yet these stories also reflect an awareness of the Latin American society these writers have now joined. Highly recommended for all large collections.ÄMolly Abramowitz, Silver Spring, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Latin American Jewish characters in this fierce collection of 22 stories are all asking the same question: Who am I? To the Christians of Latin America, they are outsiders, essentially classless people who at best should be ignored and at worst reviled. Jews settled in Latin America because of pogroms and wars over the centuries, and these tales have been written by the daughters and granddaughters of those immigrants. Their stories take place all over the Latin American mapÄin Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Mexico, Cuba, Chile and Costa RicaÄreflecting the heterogeneity of the Americas as well as the unique perspectives of the storytellers. The protagonist of "Gotlib, Bombero," by Barbara Mujica recalls his father's escape from Germany as he wrestles with his position in Chilean society, wondering if the local volunteer fire department will allow him to join. In Ana Vasquez's "The Sign of the Star," El¡as, a Chilean schoolboy, faces the agony of isolation and hatred as his religion sets him apart from his Catholic and Protestant classmates. El¡as is violently reminded of his difference, and his struggle and self-reflection ultimately lead him to a poignant and brave redefinition and re-creation of his complex identity. Composed in an innovative narrative style, Mexican writer Margo Glantz's entertaining story-memoir describes how she transforms herself from the daughter of poor Russian immigrants to a "well-heeled" woman simply by purchasing an expensive pair of designer shoes. A range of influences, from Isaac Bashevis Singer's folklorish tales to the Latin American traditions of magical realism, attest to the writers' geographical and ethnic backgrounds. But the power of memory and regeneration is the root of this story tree, as is the writers' determination to bear witness and lay claim to their heritage. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This unique anthology unites the voices of Jewish women writers of Latin America for the first time. In the 22 stories collected here, authors from Mexico, Argentina, Costa Rica, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Venezuela, and Cuba tell of their respective cultures and heritages. While once they spoke Yiddish, Polish, Russian, Hebrew, or Ladino, these women now speak Spanish and Portuguese. Their stories focus mainly on the memory and identity of the worlds and countries they have left. In an excerpt from The Family Tree, for instance, Mexican writer Margo Glantz fleshes out the family past in Ukraine and considers the fate of the agricultural communities set up by the tsar for the Jews. Yet these stories also reflect an awareness of the Latin American society these writers have now joined. Highly recommended for all large collections.ÄMolly Abramowitz, Silver Spring, MD (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.