Cover image for The girl who chased away sorrow : the diary of Sarah Nita, a Navajo girl
Title:
The girl who chased away sorrow : the diary of Sarah Nita, a Navajo girl
Author:
Turner, Ann Warren.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, 1999.
Physical Description:
200 pages ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
920 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.1 5.0 32208.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 6.2 8 Quiz: 15349 Guided reading level: T.
ISBN:
9780590972161
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

The narrator describes her experiences as her Navajo tribe is forced to relocate by the U.S. Army in 1864 New Mexico.


Author Notes

Ann Warren Turner was born in December 1945. She is an American poet and children's author. Her poetry works include Tickle a Pickle, Street Talk, Mississippi Mud, and Learning to Swim: a Memoir. Her picture books include Dakota Dugout, When Mr. Jefferson Came to Philadelphia: What I Learned of Freedom, Pumpkin Cat, and Sitting Bull Remembers. her novels include: A Hunter Comes Home, Rosemary's Witch, and Hard Hit. She has also won first prize in 1967 from The Atlantic Monthly college creative writing contest and first prize in 1991 from the National Council for the Social Studies for Through the Stars ansd Night Skies.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-8. When Shimasani's granddaughter returns home from the white man's school, Shimasani asks her to record the story of the Long Walk. In October 1864, Shimasani (Sarah Nita) and her sister are away from their village when soldiers capture their parents and other villagers and take them away. Sarah Nita and her sister are eventually rounded up with other Navajo and forced to walk to Fort Sumner. Reunited with their family at the fort, the girls help care for their ailing father and fight for their own survival against starvation, disease, and filth. Four years later, the Navajo agree to stop raiding white settlements and promise to send their children to the white man's schools. In return, the government allows the Navajo to return to their homelands, now greatly reduced in size. Turner's use of phrases instead of dates to divide diary entries makes it easy to follow and keep track of major events, and her historical note, which is accompanied by black-and-white photos showing the Navajo at Fort Sumner, gives additional background. This new addition to the Dear America series is an accessible, forthright view of a sad chapter in American history. A map is appended. --Karen Hutt


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-Sarah Nita, 13, tells the story of the Navajo's forced 400-mile Long Walk from their ancestral homeland through winter snow to Fort Sumner. The confusion, fear, and suffering of The People are drawn with clarity and immediacy. A factual afterword gives a larger picture of the times with captioned period photographs of the Navajo. The story is rich with details of Native life gracefully woven into the telling of events. Characterizations are complete, even for minor participants. The publication information is at the rear of the book, as it is for all titles in this series, which has given rise to a general criticism that the stories are easily mistaken for actual period diaries. The CIP classification is 813.54; granted, that is American fiction, but placing this book in the nonfiction section of the library only adds to the confusion. The author's comments allow readers to believe that Sarah Nita was a real girl ("born in 1851"). All the same, it is a compelling story, and its power will attract readers.-Cris Riedel, Ellis B. Hyde Elementary School, Dansville, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.