Cover image for Pop goes the weasel
Pop goes the weasel
Patterson, James, 1947-
Personal Author:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown and Co., [1999]

Physical Description:
423 pages ; 25 cm.
A serial killer unleashes a reign of terror in Washington against black women. Detective Alex Cross goes after him and discovers a British embassy official who masquerades as a black taxi driver to lure his victims.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.1 14.0 66161.
Format :


Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Alden Ewell Free Library FICTION Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Boston Free Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Clarence Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Clearfield Library FICTION Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Collins Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Concord Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
East Aurora Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Eden Library FICTION Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
Elma Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Grand Island Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Lake Shore Library FICTION Adult Fiction Work Room
Lancaster Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Marilla Free Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf

On Order



Detective Alex Cross is in love. But his happiness is threatened by a series of chilling murders in Washington, D.C., murders with a pattern so twisted, it leaves investigators reeling. Cross's ingenious pursuit of the killer produces a suspect-a British diplomat named Geoffrey Shafer. But proving that Shafer is the murderer becomes a potentially deadly task. As the diplomat engages in a brilliant series of surprising countermoves, in and out of the courtroom, Alex and his fiancee become hopelessly entangled with the most memorable nemesis Alex Cross has ever faced. Pop Goes the Weasel reveals James Patterson at the peak of his power. Here is a chilling villain no reader will forget, a love story of great tenderness, and a plot of relentless suspense and heart-pounding pace. To read Pop Goes the Weasel is to discover why James Patterson is one of the world's greatest suspense writers.

Author Notes

James Patterson was born in Newburgh, New York, on March 22, 1947. He graduated from Manhattan College in 1969 and received a M. A. from Vanderbilt University in 1970. His first novel, The Thomas Berryman Number, was written while he was working in a mental institution and was rejected by 26 publishers before being published and winning the Edgar Award for Best First Mystery.

He is best known as the creator of Alex Cross, the police psychologist hero of such novels as Along Came a Spider and Kiss the Girls. Cross has been portrayed on the silver screen by Morgan Freeman. He has had eleven on his books made into movies and ranks as number 3 on the Hollywood Reporter's '25 Most Powerful Authors' 2016 list. He also writes the Women's Murder Club series, the Michael Bennett series, the Maximum Ride series, Daniel X series, the Witch and Wizard series, BookShots series, Private series, and the Middle School series for children. He has won numerous awards including the BCA Mystery Guild's Thriller of the Year, the International Thriller of the Year award, and the Reader's Digest Reader's Choice Award.

James Patterson introduced the Bookshots Series in 2016 which is advertised as All Thriller No Filler. The first book in the series, Cross Kill, made the New York Times Bestseller list in June 2016. The third and fourth books, The Trial, and Little Black Dress, made the New York Times Bestseller list in July 2016. The next books in the series include, $10,000,000 Marriage Proposal, French Kiss, Hidden: A Mitchum Story (co-authored with James O. Born). and The House Husband (co-authored Duane Swierczynski).

Patterson's novel, co-authored with Maxine Paetro, Woman of God, became a New York Times bestseller in 2016.

Patterson co-authored with John Connoly and Tim Malloy the true crime expose Filthy Rich about billionaire convicted sex offender Jeffrey Eppstein.

In January 2017, he co-authored with Ashwin Sanghi the bestseller Private Delhi. And in August 2017, he co-authored with Richard Dilallo, The Store.

The Black Book is a stand-alone thriller, co-authored by James Patterson and David Ellis.

(Bowker Author Biography) James Patterson is the author of seven major national bestsellers in a row. These include "Along Came a Spider", "Kiss the Girls", "Jack & Jill", "Cat & Mouse", "When the Wind Blows", "Pop Goes the Weasel", &, in paperback, "The Midnight Club". A past winner of the prestigious Edgar Award, Patterson lives in Florida.

(Publisher Provided)

Reviews 3

Booklist Review

There are few better than Patterson when it comes to spooky, scary plots and sinister, evil characters, even though his writing sometimes seems strained. In his latest macabre thriller, Patterson pits his popular hero, D.C. psychologist and cop Alex Cross, against his most fiendish villain yet. Cross is working on a series of Jane Doe murders in southeast Washington. His hard-nosed boss doesn't want to waste precious resources investigating the deaths of a bunch of "worthless prostitutes and druggies," but Cross is convinced the women are the victims of a particularly deadly serial killer. He's right, of course, and he nearly meets his match in Geoffrey Shafer, respectable British Embassy staffer by day, homicidal maniac by night. Shafer and three of his pals, all former assassins for Britain's MI6, are engaged in a deadly game called the Four Horsemen, a computer exercise in which they act out their most violent fantasies. But Shafer has turned fantasy into reality. After more than 400 pages of high-octane action, Patterson serves up a shocker of a finish that will have readers checking their locks twice. With a promised million-copy first printing and the usual mega-publicity, Patterson and his latest thriller are headed for their old stomping grounds--the top of the best-seller lists. --Emily Melton

Publisher's Weekly Review

Patterson dedicates his latest (after 1998's When the Wind Blows) to "the millions of Alex Cross readers who so frequently ask `Can't you write faster?'" Those readers won't be disappointed: the successful formula is in high gear, with the Washington, D.C., psychologist/homicide detective up to his ears in unsolved murders. This tale features a duplicitous villain, a glut of dirty office politics and the inevitable threat to someone Cross just can't live without. A highly moral character, Cross is now firmly rooted in many imaginations as Morgan Freeman, who played him in the film version of Kiss the Girls. When he's not caring for Damon and Jannie, his two young children, Cross takes boys to visit their fathers in prison and works in a soup kitchen. After his boss, Chief Pittman, refuses to believe that a serial killer is striking in the neglected Southeast section, Cross and four other officers work extra hours on their own, the only ones who really care. Readers learn early on that the killer is a British diplomat, Geoffrey Shafer, a chilling madman ostensibly holding his sanity together with drugs. Shafer is obsessed with a real-life version of a computer game called the Four Horsemen, during which he masquerades as a taxi driver who kills his unsuspecting passengers. If Shafer is almost too good to be trueÄanother fictional psychopath with infinite resourcesÄPatterson is shrewd enough to show him making mistakes (like forgetting to wash) as he comes apart at the seams. The killer is caught in the middle of the narrative, setting the scene for a bold courtroom drama. Even the disappearance of Cross's new lady love (his wife was killed in a previous book) is less of a clich‚d device than a ritual sacrifice as Patterson's well-oiled suspense machine grinds away with solid precision. 1 million first printing; $1 million ad/promo; 14-city author tour; Time Warner audio. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Library Journal Review

Alex Cross, last seen in Cat & Mouse, returns in Patterson's best book to date. With his fianc‚e, Christine, by his side, Alex has regained the happiness he lost. He can't stay happy for long, of course, and his nemesis this time is Geoffrey Shafer, the Weasel. Shafer is a British diplomat who lives a secret life; he murders people during a fantasy game he plays with three other men around the globe. Alex doesn't know it, but he and the people he cares about are the newest pawns in the game. Even with implausible situations and an absurdly evil villain, the book is impossible to put down. Patterson has another guaranteed best seller on his hands, and fans will be clamoring for the next Alex Cross adventure.ÄJeff Ayers, Seattle P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Google Preview