Cover image for Curious George
Curious George
Rey, H. A. (Hans Augusto), 1898-1977.
Publication Information:
[Boston, Mass.] : Houghton Mifflin, [1993]

Physical Description:
1 audiocassette : analog + 1 book (1 volumes (unpaged) of print and braille : color illustrations ; 26 cm)
General Note:
Side 1 has page-turn signals; side 2 does not.

Cassette has label in braille.
Reading Level:
400 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.6 0.5 5509.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.4 2 Quiz: 02673 Guided reading level: K.


Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Central Library PRINT BRAILLE CASSETTE KIT 1033 Print Braille Childrens Area
Central Library PRINT BRAILLE CASSETTE KIT 1033 Print Braille Central Closed Stacks

On Order



In this, the original book about the curious monkey, George is taken from the jungle by the man in the yellow hat to live in a new home, but--oh, what happened! Though trying to be good, George is still very curious and takes a swim in the ocean, escapes from jail, and goes for a flying ride on a bunch of balloons. This treasured classic is where it all began for the curious, loveable monkey and is a must have for any children's book collection.

Author Notes

Hans Augusto Rey was born on September 16, 1898 in Hamburg, Germany. He escaped to Paris with his wife after the Nazi's invaded. While in Paris, Hans's animal drawings came to the attention of French publisher, who commissioned him to write a children's book. The result, Rafi and the Nine Monkeys, is little remembered today, but one of its characters, an adorably impish monkey named Curious George, was such a success that the couple considered writing a book just about him. Their work was interrupted with the outbreak of World War II. As Jews, the Reys decided to flee Paris before the Nazis seized the city. Hans built two bicycles, and they fled Paris just a few hours before it fell. Among the meager possessions they brought with them was the illustrated manuscript of Curious George.

The books were published by Houghton Mifflin in 1941. Curious George was an instant success, and the Reys were commissioned to write more adventures of the mischievous monkey and his friend, the Man in the Yellow Hat. They wrote seven stories in all. Their title Happy Halloween made The New York Times Best Seller List in 2013. At first, Margret's name was left off the cover because there was a glut of women already writing children's fiction. In later editions, this was corrected, and Margret now receives full credit for her role in developing the stories.

H. A. Rey died in 1977 and in 1989 Margaret Rey established the Curious George Foundation to help creative children and prevent cruelty to animals.

(Bowker Author Biography)

Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

This is a pop-up version of the favorite title about the inquisitive monkey who unintentionally wreaks havoc on an entire city just by poking into things. By opening a page or yanking the right tabs, readers can watch George put on the yellow hat (the act that leads to his capture), get rescued from his attempt at flying, and teeter on the telephone lines. The firefighting sequence (when George accidentally calls the fire department) is action-packed, and the final pop-ups, of the monkey with his balloons, are inspired. For modern readers, George's kidnapping may seem severe. But this is a grand adventure in any format, and pop-ups make the still-curious monkey fly. Ages 4-8. (October) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-The timeless antics of Curious George are given new life in this read-along series, which faithfully follows the text of each story. A male narrator, accompanied by minimal musical interludes and sound effects, reads the story, once with page-turn signals and once without on each CD. Sounds effects occasionally explain pertinent parts of the unspoken story, like a splash in the water when George takes a dive into the ocean. Curious George Feeds the Animals has a female reader, with a male counterpart reading the Man with the Yellow Hat's lines. Margaret and H.A. Rey's original character has been entertaining children for decades, but it's hard to imagine a child today who wouldn't be puzzled by The Man with the Yellow Hat plucking George from his environment and transporting him to another country, George's imprisonment (and jail-break!) for inadvertently dialing the fire department while playing with the phone, or the fact that the Man in the Yellow Hat leaves his charge unattended when he takes him to a movie. Still, a naughty anthropomorphic monkey is entertaining, and adults may want to take the opportunity to explain to pint-sized listeners that their monkey-shines won't warrant the same results. Curious George certainly deserves a spot on the shelf, and these engaging stories will provide a good exercise in imagination and creativity. A solid choice, especially with an all-new animated adventure based on the classic tales debuting as a feature film in February 2006.-Kirsten Martindale, formerly Menomonie Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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