Cover image for Microprocessor architecture, programming, and applications with the 8085
Title:
Microprocessor architecture, programming, and applications with the 8085
Author:
Gaonkar, Ramesh S.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Fourth edition.
Publication Information:
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
x, 788 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
General Note:
First-2nd eds. published under title: Microprocessor architecture, programming, and applications with the 8085/8080A.

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780139012570
Format :
Book

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Central Library TK7895.M5 G36 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Created for one/two semester undergraduate level courses in Introduction to Microprocessors offered in electrical and computer technology departments; requires a prerequisite course in digital logic, but assumes no knowledge of programming. The first of its kind to offer an integrated treatment of both the hardware and software aspects of the microprocessor, this comprehensive and thoroughly updated text focuses on the 8085 microprocessor family to teach the basic concepts underlying programmable devices. Providing a sound pedagogy - from basic concepts to applications - it fully prepares students to apply concepts learned to other microprocessors in higher level courses or to a variety of situations they may encounter in their future jobs.


Table of Contents

Part I Microprocessor-Based Systems: Hardware and Interfacingp. 1
Chapter 1 Microprocessors, Microcomputers, and Assembly Languagep. 3
1.1 Microprocessorsp. 4
1.2 Microprocessor Instruction Set and Computer Languagesp. 13
1.3 From Large Computers to Single Chip Microcontrollersp. 20
1.4 Application: Microprocessor-Controlled Temperature System (MCTS)p. 24
Chapter 2 Introduction to 8085 Assembly Language Programmingp. 31
2.1 The 8085 Programming Modelp. 32
2.2 Instruction Classificationp. 34
2.3 Instruction, Data Format, and Storagep. 37
2.4 How to Write, Assemble, and Execute a Simple Programp. 42
2.5 Overview of the 8085 Instruction Setp. 46
2.6 Writing and Hand Assembling a Programp. 50
Chapter 3 Microprocessor Architecture and Microcomputer Systemsp. 57
3.1 Microprocessor Architecture and Its Operationsp. 58
3.2 Memoryp. 63
3.3 Input and Output (I/O) Devicesp. 80
3.4 Example of a Microcomputer Systemp. 81
3.5 Review: Logic Devices for Interfacingp. 83
3.6 Microprocessor-Based System Application: MCTSp. 90
Chapter 4 8085 Microprocessor Architecture and Memory Interfacingp. 95
4.1 The 8085 MPUp. 96
4.2 Example of an 8085-Based Microcomputerp. 109
4.3 Memory Interfacingp. 116
4.4 Interfacing the 8155 Memory Segmentp. 123
4.5 Illustrative Example: Designing Memory for the MCTS Projectp. 126
4.6 Testing and Troubleshooting Memory Interfacing Circuitsp. 129
4.7 How Does an 8085-Based Single-Board Microcomputer Work?p. 132
Chapter 5 Interfacing I/O Devicesp. 139
5.1 Basic Interfacing Conceptsp. 140
5.2 Interfacing Output Displaysp. 150
5.3 Interfacing Input Devicesp. 155
5.4 Memory-Mapped I/Op. 157
5.5 Testing and Troubleshooting I/O Interfacing Circuitsp. 163
5.6 Some Questions and Answersp. 164
Part II Programming the 8085p. 173
Chapter 6 Introduction to 8085 Instructionsp. 175
6.1 Data Transfer (Copy) Operationsp. 176
6.2 Arithmetic Operationsp. 86
6.3 Logic Operationsp. 96
6.4 Branch Operationsp. 204
6.5 Writing Assembly Language Programsp. 210
6.6 Debugging a Programp. 215
6.7 Some Puzzling Questions and Their Answersp. 215
Chapter 7 Programming Techniques with Additional Instructionsp. 227
7.1 Programming Techniques: Looping, Counting, and Indexingp. 228
7.2 Additional Data Transfer and 16-Bit Arithmetic Instructionsp. 232
7.3 Arithmetic Operations Related to Memoryp. 241
7.4 Logic Operations: Rotatep. 247
7.5 Logic Operations: Comparep. 254
7.6 Dynamic Debuggingp. 261
Chapter 8 Counters and Time Delaysp. 275
8.1 Counters and Time Delaysp. 276
8.2 Illustrative Program: Hexadecimal Counterp. 282
8.3 Illustrative Program: Zero-to-Nine (Modulo Ten) Counterp. 285
8.4 Illustrative Program: Generating Pulse Waveformsp. 288
8.5 Debugging Counter and Time-Delay Programsp. 290
Chapter 9 Stack and Subroutinesp. 295
9.1 Stackp. 296
9.2 Subroutinep. 305
9.3 Restart, Conditional Call, and Return Instructionsp. 315
9.4 Advanced Subroutine Conceptsp. 316
Chapter 10 Code Conversion, BCD Arithmetic, and 16-Bit Data Operationsp. 323
10.1 BCD-to-Binary Conversionp. 324
10.2 Binary-to-BCD Conversionp. 327
10.3 BCD-to-Seven-Segment-LED Code Conversionp. 329
10.4 Binary-to-ASCII and ASCII-to-Binary Code Conversionp. 332
10.5 BCD Additionp. 334
10.6 BCD Subtractionp. 337
10.7 Introduction to Advanced Instructions and Applicationsp. 338
10.8 Multiplicationp. 342
10.9 Subtraction with Carryp. 344
Chapter 11 Software Development Systems and Assemblersp. 351
11.1 Microprocessor-Based Software Development Systemsp. 352
11.2 Operating Systems and Programming Toolsp. 354
11.3 Assemblers and Cross-Assembersp. 359
11.4 Writing Programs Using a Cross-Assemblerp. 363
Part III Interfacing Peripherals (I/Os) and Applicationsp. 371
Chapter 12 Interruptsp. 375
12.1 The 8085 Interruptp. 376
12.2 8085 Vectored Interruptsp. 385
12.3 Restart as Software Instructionsp. 393
12.4 Additional I/O Concepts and Processesp. 395
Chapter 13 Interfacing Data Convertersp. 403
13.1 Digital-to-Analog (D/A) Convertersp. 404
13.2 Analog-to-Digital (A/D) Convertersp. 414
Chapter 14 Programmable Interface Devices: 8155 I/O and Timer; 8279 Keyboard/Display Interfacep. 425
14.1 Basic Concepts in Programmable Devicesp. 426
14.2 The 8155: Multipurpose Programmable Devicep. 432
14.3 The 8279 Programmable Keyboard/Display Interfacep. 450
Chapter 15 General-Purpose Programmable Peripheral Devicesp. 459
15.1 The 8255A Programmable Peripheral Interfacep. 460
15.2 Illustration: Interfacing Keyboard and Seven-Segment Displayp. 479
15.3 Illustration: Bidirectional Data Transfer Between Two Microcomputersp. 488
15.4 The 8254 (8253) Programmable Interval Timerp. 494
15.5 The 8259A Programmable Interrupt Controllerp. 505
15.6 Direct Memory Access (DMA) and the 8237 DMA Controllerp. 514
Chapter 16 Serial I/O and Data Communicationp. 523
16.1 Basic Concepts in Serial I/Op. 524
16.2 Software-Controlled Asynchronous Serial I/Op. 534
16.3 The 8085--Serial I/O Lines: SOD and SIDp. 537
16.4 Hardware-Controlled Serial I/O Using Programmable Chipsp. 540
Chapter 17 Microprocessor Applicationsp. 563
17.1 Interfacing Scanned Multiplexed Displays and Liquid Crystal Displaysp. 464
17.2 Interfacing a Matrix Keyboardp. 573
17.3 Memory Designp. 581
17.4 MPU Designp. 589
17.5 Designing a System: Single-Board Microcomputerp. 592
17.6 Software Designp. 597
17.7 Development and Troubleshooting Toolsp. 603
Chapter 18 Extending 8-Bit Microprocessor Concepts to Higher-Level Processors and Microcontrollersp. 607
18.1 8-Bit Microprocessors Contemporary to the 8085p. 608
18.2 Review of Microprocessor Conceptsp. 611
18.3 16-Bit Microprocessorsp. 612
18.4 High-End-High-Performance Processorsp. 626
18.5 Single-Chip Microcontrollersp. 633
Appendix A Number Systemsp. 637
Appendix B Introduction to the EMAC Primerp. 645
Appendix C Pin Configuration of Selected Logic and Display Devicesp. 659
Appendix D Specifications: Data Converters and Peripheral Devicesp. 669
Appendix E American Standard Code for Information Interchange: ASCII Codesp. 735
Appendix F 8085 Instruction Setp. 737
Appendix G Solutions to Selected Questions, Problems, and Programming Assignmentsp. 785
Appendix H Introduction to 8085 Assemblers and Simulatorsp. 801
Indexp. 815

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