Cover image for Middleware
Title:
Middleware
Author:
Serain, Daniel, 1947-
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Middleware. English
Publication Information:
New York : Springer, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
ix, 217 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
Translation of: Le middleware.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9781852330118
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
QA76.76.M54 S4713 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Middleware is a layer of software situated between the operating system and the applications, permitting them to exchange information among themselves. This book looks at some of the typical problems found in businesses, that can be solved by an approach based on middleware technologies and also describes the close interlap of the Internet with middleware. Middleware contributes to the diffusion and understanding of role played by middleware in the design of future complex information systems and will be important reading for practitioners. This book is aimed at senior designers and technical managers, which would include both professionals working for sophisticated user organisations and those working for software suppliers and systems houses. It is also written to be part of a final year university course in Information Technology Applied to Business Management and as such will of interest to final year undergraduates as well.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
1. Middlewarep. 1
1.1 The Problems to Be Solvedp. 1
1.2 Middlewarep. 4
1.3 Internet and Client-Server Architecturesp. 24
1.4 Object-oriented Modelling (OOM)p. 27
1.5 Conclusionsp. 29
2. Message-based Middlewarep. 31
2.1 Introductionp. 31
2.2 Principal Functionsp. 32
2.3 Evaluation of the Principal Productsp. 38
3. RPC-based Middlewarep. 43
3.1 The Client-Server Modelp. 43
3.2 Client-Server and Procedure Callp. 44
3.3 Principles of the Remote Procedure Call Architecturep. 46
3.4 Concept of Contract between Client and Serverp. 47
3.5 Structure of Communicationp. 51
3.6 The Standardp. 54
4. CORBA: Standard Object-based Middlewarep. 63
4.1 Introductionp. 63
4.2 The CORBA Conceptual Modelp. 66
4.3 The CORBA Architecturep. 70
4.4 The CORBA 2.0 Standardp. 75
4.5 Object Servicesp. 78
5. OLE/COM: Object-based Middleware from Microsoftp. 81
5.1 Introductionp. 81
5.2 The COM Object Modelp. 82
5.3 OLE2p. 92
6. Comparison between CORBA and OLE/COMp. 97
6.1 Introductionp. 97
6.2 Code Reuse: Inheritance and Aggregationp. 99
6.3 Composite Document Handling: OLE2 (COM) and OpenDoc (CORBA)p. 101
6.4 Bridge between CORBA and DCOMp. 103
6.5 Summary Tablep. 104
7. Internet and Middlewarep. 105
7.1 Introduction to the Internetp. 105
7.2 Internet Architecturesp. 118
7.3 Putting an Application onto the Internetp. 122
8. JAVA RMI and Java Beansp. 131
8.1 The Java Languagep. 131
8.2 Distributed Processing with Javap. 133
8.3 Internet: Downloading and Execution of Appletsp. 135
8.4 Remote Method Invocation: Java RMIp. 140
8.5 Java Beans and ActiveXp. 144
9. Introduction to Object Technologyp. 149
9.1 The Concept of an Objectp. 149
9.2 Principal Characteristics of Object Technologyp. 151
10. MethodF: A Method for Object-oriented Analysis and Designp. 165
10.1 Introductionp. 165
10.2 Specification Phasep. 168
10.3 Analysis Phasep. 174
10.4 Design Phasep. 187
10.5 Implementation Phasep. 193
10.6 Summary of MethodF's Principal Stepsp. 199
11. Conclusionp. 201
11.1 Choosing Middlewarep. 202
11.2 The Complete Approach: From Company Requirements to Middleware Infrastructurep. 203
Bibliography/Cybographyp. 205
Glossaryp. 207
Indexp. 211